Dryad & Frictionless Data

Guided by our commitment to make research data publishing more seamless and also re-usable, we are thrilled to partner with Open Knowledge Foundation and the Frictionless Data team to enhance our submission processes. Integrating the Frictionless Data toolkit, Dryad will be able to directly provide feedback to authors on the structure of tabular files uploaded. This will also allow for automated file level metadata to be created at upload and available for download for published datasets.

We are excited to get moving on this project and with support from the Sloan Foundation, Open Knowledge Foundation has just announced a job opening to contribute to this work. Please check out the posting and circulate it to any developers who may be interested in building out this functionality with us: https://okfn.org/about/jobs/

Call for Nominations: Dryad Scientific Advisory Committee

Dryad was founded over a decade ago by researchers who called for an open, accessible home for research data to be curated, archived and published. Since its founding, Dryad has long been rooted in researcher values, led by and serving various scientific communities. 

In recent discussions, and raised at a recent NSF supported workshop focusing on researcher perspectives, it has become clear that beyond our governing, Dryad should have a committee of scientists across disciplines and career stages who can advise on Dryad’s strategic directions and provide expert advice on field standards.

We are pleased to announce a call for nominations for the inaugural Dryad Scientific Advisory Committee. As Dryad’s current and future users include a broad diversity of individuals, disciplines of study, geographies, career stages and backgrounds, this Scientific Advisory Committee will reflect that global and diverse perspective, and operate using inclusive participation practices. This group will meet quarterly, provide feedback on strategic plans or initiatives and be an advocate for Dryad as well as relay community concerns to Dryad’s leadership. The time commitment involved will be 10-20 hours over the course of the year. 

Please consider nominating a colleague or yourself here. We ask in the nomination process that you please consider current or emerging leaders in their field of study and voices that may not already be represented in the open science community.

Dryad Scientific Advisory Committee Nomination Form

Questions? Please contact Dryad Executive Director Tracy Teal <director@datadryad.org>

Deadline for nominations is 2020 October 30 Anywhere On Earth, but we know there’s a lot going on right now, so nominations will still be accepted past this date.

Welcoming new board members and thanking outgoing members

As a community organization, Dryad is governed by a board elected by its members. We are pleased to share that several individuals will be joining the Dryad Board of Directors. Their addition to the board will help to continue to position the organization as a critical leader in data sharing and publishing. 

Dryad Board members serve a 3 year term and volunteer their time and energy to directly impact our community and our organization. The 12-member rotating Board aims for both diversity of perspective and depth of expertise, and a strength is that with our staggered terms, the Board is always changing. Our new Board of Directors were nominated by the governance committee and voted onto the board by the Dryad membership. We thank our outgoing members and welcome new members, as well as extend a heartfelt thanks to Directors past, present, and future for their contributions and dedication to Dryad’s mission.

Farewell to Outgoing Board Members

Emilio Bruna has served on the Dryad board for two terms, totalling 6 years. He has provided consistent and thoughtful guidance from a researcher and journal editor perspective and been committed to expanding access to data sharing, particularly in South America. 

Jennifer Lin served on the board for two terms, serving as chair of the board in 2017-2018 and secretary in 2016-2017. She helped guide the organization through several transitions, and brought a broad perspective on publishing, non-profit structure, governance and change management. We have appreciated and are grateful for her insight, ideas, dedication and advocacy for Dryad during her time on the board. 

Brian Hole most recently served as Treasurer for Dryad’s Board. He has provided invaluable fiscal oversight and perspective to the organization through his time on the board, and we’re grateful for his work. 

Carly Strasser served one term on the board, and we’re grateful for her guidance and perspective as a researcher, working in the funding space and involvement in developing and advocating for open data practices and principles. 

After two terms on the board, Chuck Fox moved to an ex officio capacity on the board last year, this year stepping off the board. In addition to his 7 years of service and leadership, including as chair, secretary and three years as treasurer, in an ex officio capacity he has provided key perspective on the organization and continued to help guide its future. 

We are truly grateful to these outgoing members who have volunteered their time to guide Dryad, dedicating significant time and energy to help chart our past, present and future and grow Dryad as a sustainable and community-oriented organization.

Welcome to New Board Members

We also want to congratulate and welcome to the Board four new members, along with Fiona Murphy as a re-elected member. We are grateful and excited to have this group of individuals join the board and bring their unique talents, expertise and perspectives to the work of the organization in order to further our vision of promoting a world where research data is openly available and routinely re-used to create knowledge.  Below are bios of each of our newest members.

Scott Edmunds is Editor-in-Chief for GigaScience, a self-proclaimed data nerd, and an Executive Committee member for Open Data Hong Kong. He has co-founded Citizen Science organisations Bauhinia Genome and CitizenScience.Asia and also teaches data management and curation at Hong Kong University. His academic background includes training in Biochemistry at Imperial College and a PhD on the Molecular Pathology of Ocular Melanoma at the Royal London Hospital, where his research mainly focused on Cancer Cell and Molecular Biology. After postdoctoral positions on Cancer Molecular Pathology at the WHO International Agency for Research in Cancer in Lyon and Institute of Cell and Molecular Sciences in London (Queen Mary) he was senior scientific editor for the BMC Genomics and Bioinformatics journals at BioMed Central before moving in 2010 to Shenzhen/Hong Kong to set up the GigaScience journal and GigaDB database for the BGI (the world’s largest genomic organisation). Working with the British Library and DataCite, GigaScience published its first data (the genome of the deadly German outbreak strain of E. coli) in June 2011. 

Brooks Hanson serves as the Executive Vice President for Science for the American Geophysical Union (AGU). He’s responsible for overseeing AGU’s publications, meetings, and ethics programs and Thriving Earth Exchange and coordinating science activities across these. He served previously as Sr. Vice President for Publications at AGU, responsible for AGU’s portfolio of many books and 20 journals and their editorial operations, helping set overall editorial policies, and leading future developments. Before arriving at AGU, he served as the Deputy Editor for Physical Sciences at Science and earlier as an editor at Science. Brooks has a Ph.D. in Geology from UCLA and held a post-doctoral appointment at the Department of Mineral Sciences, Smithsonian Institution. His main areas or research and publications span the tectonics of the western U.S., metamorphic petrology, modeling magmatic and hydrothermal processes, and on scholarly publishing. He is a fellow of the Geological Society of American and Mineralogical Society of America.

Judy Ruttenberg is the Director of Scholars and Scholarship at the Association of Research Libraries. With more than twenty years of experience working in and on behalf of academic and research libraries, Ruttenberg’s expertise is in scholarly communication and collections, collaboration, and strategic partnerships. Ruttenberg is currently working with a committee of ARL deans and directors, a team of ARL staff, and key partners in the research and learning community to advance open science by design within research institutions. An experienced project leader, Ruttenberg recently co-directed an IMLS and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation-funded initiative on open, linked, interoperable metadata called SHARE, of which Dryad was a participating repository. She is particularly focused on research data policy and governance, and on strengthening relationships between data curators within universities and federal agencies.

Jason Williams is Assistant Director, External Collaborations at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory DNA Learning Center where he develops national biology education programs. Jason leads education, outreach, and training for CyVerse (US national cyberinfrastructure for the life sciences) and has trained thousands of students, researchers and educators in bioinformatics, data science, and molecular biology. Jason’s focus has been developing bioinformatics in undergraduate education and career-spanning learning for biologists. Jason’s “Reinventing Scientific Talent” proposal was a winning entry in the US National Science Foundation’s NSF 2026 Idea Machine search for the next set of “Big Ideas”; proposals that will shape funding priorities for the foundation. Jason is founder of LifeSciTrainers.org – a global effort to promote community of practice among professionals who develop short-format training for life scientists. Jason is also a member of and has chaired science advisory boards in the US, UK, and Australia, and is a former chair of the Software Carpentry Foundation. In 2020, Jason was recognized as a US National Academy of Sciences Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow. Jason is also a teacher at the Yeshiva University High School for Girls.

Thank you to all who serve on the board, and we look forward to working together to advance Dryad’s mission. 

Institutional Membership Webinar – October 1, 2020

Over the last year, Dryad has built upon our existing publisher and funder member community to include institutions globally who are interested in supporting best practice data publishing for their researchers. We invite you to join us on October 1st to learn more about our institutional membership, and hear from three institutional members on their unique perspectives and experiences with Dryad. The webinar will include a broader discussion about researcher needs, especially in the current landscape, and include time for Q&A with the panel.

The webinar is geared towards anyone interested in learning more how Dryad membership is working at a variety of institutions, and relevant for a variety of audiences, including…

  • Research managers
  • Librarians
  • Research IT 
  • Campus research groups 
  • Universities/colleges interested in learning more.  

Please join us!

When: Thursday, October 1st @ 8am PST / 11am EST / 3pm GMT

Featured Panel:

  • Jeanine Finn, Data Science & Digital Scholarship Coordinator, The Claremont Colleges
  • John Borghi, Research & Instruction Manager, Lane Medical Library, Stanford University
  • Karl Benedict, Director of Research Data Services/Director of IT, University of New Mexico

Registration: https://tinyurl.com/DryadMembershipWebinar 

For those who are interested in joining but cannot make it, we will post a recording following the event for those who are registered. We look forward to seeing you on October 1st! 

Looking ahead: a letter from our Executive Director

Just over three months into my role as Dryad Executive Director, I’m reflecting on my transition and what I’ve learned so far – what we’ve been doing and where we’re planning to go next in our programmatic work as well as organizational capacity and sustainability planning. But this transition has been more than just a new role for me, it comes at a time when as a scientific community we’re reflecting on our responsibilities, who our systems serve and who they don’t, our collaborations, what it means to work and share openly and our capacity to work together to do better together. This moment demands our attention and our focus, but these challenges and opportunities require more than short-term commitments. We need to continue to reflect and build, not just something that meets this moment, but that will sustain and move us forward towards our vision of sharing data and working together to create knowledge for science and society. Rather than just reacting, we can respond with intention – evaluating, supporting and re-envisioning our systems and our communities.  

Previously as Executive Director of The Carpentries, I worked with the community to create inclusive training, teaching people to work effectively with data and code, in a movement to empower all people to answer questions that are important to them. In that work, I noticed that another missing piece is access to the data to answer those questions. We need to both bring people to data and bring data to people, to democratize data, for each moment, each crisis, each person, each challenge and each opportunity. This is only work that can be accomplished if all researchers, organizations and institutions work together – sharing knowledge, creating pathways and connections and building relationships. Through my work as a researcher, with The Carpentries and now with Dryad, I’ve had the great opportunity of meeting many members of the data community, and while we have challenges in front of us, I am inspired by the commitment of so many to affect change and look forward to continuing these conversations and work within the Dryad community. 

Dryad’s connections 

Dryad is researcher-led and open, both in its publishing, and in its community, qualities that drew me to the organization. What I’ve continued to learn about Dryad in the last few months is that Dryad’s alignment with the scientific community and those promoting open, curated data publications enable us to focus on how to curate and publish quality datasets, at scale. I believe that part of the reason Dryad has seen such success in the last years, is by building like-minded partnerships and collaborations over its tenure. Working closely with those that hold similar values like the National Science Foundation, institutional resources (e.g., NESCent), the Data Curation Network, and now our partnerships with California Digital Library and Zenodo, we can have an even more effective reach in the scientific community. Going forward, it’s important to think not just about submitting data, but about listening and working together to pioneer new ways of making data re-use more prevalent and accessible.

Curation at our core

These ideals are heavily reflected in our data publishing platform, but also in our curation emphasis. To promote and publish FAIR data, it is essential that Dryad maintains its roots in curation, even if how curation looks may differ from Dryad’s inception. I’m finding that as the community shifts to value curation, we need to question what quality curation practices look like at multi-disciplinary repositories. Disciplinary repositories have long supported detailed curation, specific to the type of data being submitted. At Dryad, we need to assess what quality looks like at our scale and across disciplines, thinking about what level of checks are appropriate and attainable, and adjust both our workflows and the community’s expectations. We cannot do this alone.

In my first 90 days I have had the opportunity to learn from and share my experience at multiple venues spanning from the NIH’s General Repository workshop, meetings with the Data Curation Network, and more recently at the Open Publishing Fest with colleagues at Wormbase. In my next 90 days, I look forward to continuing to work with these groups and more that are interested in quality curation at scale, and how to implement this in a way that is accessible to researchers. 

Going forward

Dryad has and will continue to maintain broad researcher support, and as the current climate has increased a spotlight on the importance of data publishing, I want to take a moment to outline how I think Dryad can improve to more effectively publish FAIR, re-usable, data, and where we can go next.

It is essential that Dryad remains focused on researcher-adoption of best practices for open data publishing. We’ve seen this adoption, with increased submissions annually, and more stories of data re-use, and it’s important that as research evolves we evolve with the scientists and broaden our diversity of perspectives. Our platform and partnerships are focused on seamless workflows to accommodate increased submissions and we are very excited about the upcoming integrations with journal submission systems and Zenodo.

With increased submissions and an emphasis on adoption, we will need to continue to optimize for quality and volume. Dryad has done this successfully over the last ten years, and going forward, I will be investigating the right level of curation and resources required for the growing scale. This may mean investing more in automated FAIR checking, tools for researcher education during the submission process, and considering the role of institutional data curators looking to steward their research outputs. 

Beyond these operational improvements, it is important for Dryad to continue to push the envelope in data publishing. Ten years ago, Dryad was critical in supporting the development of data policies at publishers. Data availability statements and having a place to house data will always be important. But, growing and evolving with researchers means putting a larger emphasis on data re-use and equitable access, as data-driven discovery gains traction and researchers are eager to broaden the impact of their research through data publications. We need to consider how to make data re-use more accessible, thinking about how this practice can be promoted and encouraging best practices.

The research data community has given me a warm welcome, and it is a community that I am thrilled to be a part of. I am privileged to have the opportunity to steward Dryad into the future as a trusted multi-disciplinary data repository. Today’s challenges continue to show the importance of collective impact, working together towards a shared goal, and the essential value of backbone organizations in open data. Dryad has played and will continue to play a leading role in the research data ecosystem.  We have important work to do together, and as challenging as the current times are, it’s also shown people’s instincts to help each other. Thinking about how to better operationalize Dryad, to better support researchers in data curation, publishing, sharing and re-use, is something that I cannot do alone, and I am very excited and grateful to continue working with our staff, partners and the larger community to go further together.

Funded Partnership Brings Dryad and Zenodo Closer

By Daniella Lowenberg (Cross posted at Zenodo)

With increasing mandates and initiatives around open data and software, researchers commonly have to make a choice about where to deposit their non-article outputs. Unfortunately, systems that are built to accommodate these objects work separately and can make the process more difficult. As a result, data, code, figures, and other outputs go to a variety of disconnected places, or improper homes (i.e. code with the wrong license or data not curated). To tackle this issue, and make open research best practices more seamless for researchers, we are thrilled to announce a partnership between Dryad and Zenodo.

Dryad is a leader in data curation and data publishing. For the last ten years, Dryad has focused primarily on research data, supporting a CC0 license and manually curating each incoming dataset. Zenodo, a general use repository hosted at CERN, has been paving the way in software citation and publishing. As long time players in the open science movement, we believe that we can advance open science and open-source projects further by working together.  Instead of working individually to broaden each our scopes, building competitive features, and inefficiently using our limited resources, Dryad and Zenodo will be working together to support more seamless workflows that make the process easier for researchers. 

To jumpstart this collaboration, we are proud to have been awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation grant that will enable us to co-develop new solutions focused on supporting researcher and publisher workflows as well as best practices in data and software curation. By focusing on integrations between our systems, leveraging data and software expertise, we can both extend the reach of our services and open up more opportunities for broader research communities.  We are looking forward to re-imagining the submission process for researchers and how we can better support our journal publishing and institutional communities along the way.

Our leadership teams are dedicated to the future of our co-development projects. “Dryad has long admired the work Zenodo does in our shared space and we are thrilled to finally find a way to collaborate on a project that benefits researchers around the globe. The Dryad-Zenodo integration is an excellent example of how two like-minded organizations can join together in a shared vision,” says Melissanne Scheld, Executive Director at Dryad. 

Dryad and Zenodo have always shared the same Open Science values, this is why we are very excited to partner up with such a talented team and bring the future of scientific publication one step closer to reality. We look forward to this inspiring collaboration with Dryad as well as helping the research community to move science forward.” says Jose Benito Gonzalez, Head of Digital Repositories at CERN/Zenodo.

As we embark on this open-source project and partnership together, we invite community feedback and input.  

Data Curation from Down Under: the 14th International Digital Curation Conference

img_5196.jpgIt was a long journey from Chapel Hill, NC to Melbourne, Australia, but it was definitely worth it to attend the 14th International Digital Curation Conference (IDCC). The IDCC is always a great event for people involved in digital curation and preservation, especially when it is in a beautiful city like Melbourne. I was excited to attend this year and to take part in a 10-minute lightning talk on the Data Curation Network (DCN) entitled “The Data Curation Network: A Curator Perspective”. (More on this later in this post.) I’d like to take this opportunity to share some highlights from the conference.

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This theme of this year’s IDCC, “Collaborations and Partnerships: addressing the big digital challenges together”, fits perfectly with what the Data Curation Network is all about. The Data Curation Network puts into place a cross-institutional staffing model connecting a network of expert data curators to increase local curation capacity, strengthen collaboration and support the sharing of research data. (To read more about the DCN and Dryad’s participation in the network, see Elizabeth Hull’s previous blog post announcing Dryad’s participation in the DCN launch.)

40235616193_c930f23f41_mThe main conference was kicked off with a “Welcome to Country Ceremony” conducted by a Wurundjeri Community Elder, along with a welcome to the University of Melbourne from Gwenda Thomas, Directory Scholarly Services and University Librarian. Kevin Ashley, Director, Digital Curation Centre, also gave a welcome to IDCC19 that included a challenge to conference participants: “listen, talk, interact and be inspired to do something”.

40235541493_9b52a0d5ba_zThe opening keynote, which was presented by independent journalist Christine Kenneally and was entitled “Data, the creation of history and its impact on real lives“, related the compelling story of millions of orphans from around the world (including Australia and the US) searching for information about themselves. The orphans’ story highlighted the importance and direct impact of data on both a societal and an individual level, a theme that would emerge throughout  the conference.

After the keynote, the various presentations in the form of parallel sessions, posters and lightning talks began. Throughout the conference, these presentations were organized into broad topics such as:

  • Grand curation challenges across disciplines
  • Metadata
  • Trust47200267751_009c42e246_z
  • Data quality
  • Digital humanities
  • Examples and models / Models and tools
  • Research disciplines & data services
  • Research data management / Research data services
  • Digital curation & preservation
  • Building diverse and Inclusive Communities
  • Curating indigenous data
  • Skills

As a representative of the DCN, I took part in a lightning talk session with a presentation put together by Erin Clary (Dryad Senior Curator), Lisa Johnston (Principal Investigator for the DCN and Director of the Data Repository for the University of Minnesota) and myself. The presentation focused on the experiences Erin and I have had so far as curators with the DCN pilot. After Lisa gave a brief overview of the DCN, I described the training and preparation all participating curators undertook and what it was like for Erin and me to actually begin curating DCN submissions.

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John Chodacki (Director, University of California Curation Center) gave a great presentation about the “Community Led Open Data Infrastructure: CDL & Dryad Partnership” in which he shared how and why the partnership came about and what it means going forward. John followed up immediately with another presentation about “The Research Organization Registry“. As an added bonus after the conference, John led the workshop “Accelerating Data Publication: new models for research institutions”. (For a summary of the workshop, see the blog post from the perspective of workshop attendee Dr. Richard Ferrers.)

The thought-provoking final keynote was presented remotely (in light of the recent US Government shutdown) by Dr. Patricia Brennan, Director, US National Library of Medicine. Her presentation, “Jumping into the stream of data curation“, highlighted the enormous amount of data curated each day by the National Library of Medicine. Dr. screen-shot-2019-02-28-at-2.47.44-pm.pngBrennan spoke of an “information tsunami”, the challenges inherent in curating all that data and what those challenges may mean for the future of data curation. Her presentation highlighted the shift in focus by data curation professionals over the years from pushing efforts to encourage data curation to figuring out how we move forward now that those efforts are paying off with a torrent of data given the limited resources available.

The conference came to an end all too soon with closing remarks by Kevin Ashley and Donna McRostie and an IDCC 2019 theme song that put a smile on everyone’s face. Next year, curators will do it all again at the 15th International Digital Curation Conference in (drum roll, please) … Dublin, Ireland!

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And Now, the Numbers . . .

As the new year begins, we take note of the increasing diversity of fields represented in data archived at Dryad and review the numbers for 2016.

Dryad Grows into a General Repository

We are excited to see Dryad’s role in the preservation of data expand into new areas and fields in 2016. Researchers submitted more data involving human subjects and data from social media. In addition, a quick look at our most popular data shows that two of the top five downloaded packages were from the fields of cardiology and science journalism. While Dryad’s origins are in the life sciences, it is increasingly being used as a general repository for data from a myriad of fields.

Let’s take a look at the numbers for 2016:

Increase in Number of Data Packages and Data Files

Our curators were busy! The total number of published data packages (sets of data files associated with a publication) at the end of the year was a whopping 15,325. Our curators meticulously archived 4,307 packages, a 10% increase from 2015. The size of data packages also continued to grow – from an average of 481MB to an average of 573MB, an increase of about 20%.summary of Dryad data packages 2016

At the end of 2016, we were closing in on 50,000 archived data files; by January of this year, we passed that mark.

In a future blog, we’ll talk about the integration of new journals into the Dryad submission process, new members, and new partnerships. For now, we’ll just note that there was a 22% increase in the number of journals that have data in Dryad linking back to the article.

New Fields

We’ve seen a significant uptick in human subjects data and social media data this year, which has prompted us to develop an FAQ on cleaning and de-identification of human subjects data for public access. As the idea of what data should be preserved continues to broaden, submissions of these kinds of data will only increase. We’ll keep you updated about this trend in future blogs.

Top Downloads

Let’s take a look at the most popular data published in 2016, in terms of downloads. Among the top 5 downloads includes data on plant genetics, the early history of ray-finned fishes, and, not surprisingly in this age, the effects of climate change on boreal forests.

Also of interest are data from an article in Science evaluating how people make use of Sci-Hub, an open source scholarly library. Our guest blog on these data by science journalist John Bohannon generated a lot of interest this year and was one of our most popular blog posts ever.

Another significant development in 2016 came from the medical sciences. A comparison of coronary diagnostic techniques marked Dryad’s first submission from one of the top five cardiology journals, JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

The fact that 2 of the 5 top downloads come from fields outside of life sciences clearly indicates that data in Dryad now cover a broad range of fields.

Top 5 Downloads of Data Archived in 2016

Article Dryad DOI Number of Downloads
Wagner MR et al. (2016) Host genotype and age shape the leaf and root microbiomes of a wild perennial plant. Nature Communications 7: 12151. http://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.g60r3 3123
Bohannon J et al. (2016) Who’s downloading pirated papers? Everyone.  Science 352(6285): 508-512. http://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.q447c 2969
D’Orangeville L et al. (2016) Northeastern North America as a potential refugium for boreal forests in a warming climate. Science 352(6292): 1452-1455. http://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.785cv 741
Johnson NP et al. (2016) Continuum of vasodilator stress from rest to contrast medium to adenosine hyperemia for fractional flow reserve assessment. JACC. Cardiovascular Interventions 9(8): 757-767. http://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.f76nv 453
Lu J et al. (2016) The oldest actinopterygian highlights the cryptic early history of the hyperdiverse ray-finned fishes. Current Biology 26(12): 1602–1608. http://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.t6j72 423

Overall, we’ve had a great year and are delighted to be seeing a broader range of data from an increasing number of journals and fields. Thanks to our Board of Directors, members, and of course our staff for providing their support to make 2016 a notable year for Dryad!

Introducing Dryad’s new board members

One of the most rewarding things about working for Dryad is collaborating with talented and passionate professionals from across the globe who are dedicated to increasing the availably of open data. This summer, two new people were officially elected to serve on Dryad’s Board of Directors and we are excited to have them our governance team.

linJennifer Lin, Director of Product Management at Crossref, comes to us with lots of experience in product development and management, community outreach, scholarly communications, and more. Based in California, USA, Jennifer was instrumental in helping Dryad integrate our data submission system with PLOS journals during her tenure there. She is a data sharing evangelist, and passionate about tools for making data reusable and discoverable. We are thrilled to have her direct her energy and enthusiasm Dryad’s way.

nilssonJohan Nilsson is also new to the Dryad board and comes from the Oikos Editorial Office, a society-owned publishing foundation based at Lund University, Sweden. Johan’s past work has been as a research scientist in evolutionary ecology. He has a strong interest in scientific communication and social media engagement and focuses particularly on how the benefits of open science (and open data in particular) can be better expressed to researchers. We value his expertise and perspective into how Dryad can best serve its users.

dilloWe would be remiss if we didn’t also publicly welcome Ingrid Dillo, who was appointed to the board early in 2016. Ingrid is deputy director at DANS (Data Archiving and Networked Services). She holds a PhD in history and has a long record of policy development at DANS, the National Library of the Netherlands and Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. She is especially interested in research data management and the certification of trustworthy digital repositories. We are already relying on Ingrid’s expertise and learning from her work with groups like the Research Data Alliance.

Candidates to Dryad’s 12 member Board of Directors are nominated by Member organizations, and four of the Directors are elected or re-elected every year. Once on the Board, Directors serve as individuals rather than organizational representatives. The 12-member rotating Board aims for both diversity of perspective and depth of expertise. We are delighted to have achieved both with our new Directors. We welcome them onboard and wish to extend a heartfelt thanks to Directors past, present, and future for their contributions and dedication to Dryad’s mission.

Applications open for Dryad Executive Director

Dryad is seeking an energetic and enthusiastic Executive Director, ideally with experience in scientific or biomedical research, librarianship, or publishing, to oversee development and operation of the organisation during a period of rapid growth and transformation. The role reports to the Board of Directors. Externally, the postholder will be responsible for building relationships with stakeholders, customers and users of the Dryad Digital Repository. Internally, key responsibilities include organisational leadership and ensuring Dryad meets its objectives through sound financial management and oversight of day-to-day operations, with the support of a small but growing staff.  Review of applications will begin by September 1, 2014 and continue until the position is filled. For details please see the full position description and for inquiries please contact director@datadryad.org.