Dryad & Frictionless Data

Guided by our commitment to make research data publishing more seamless and also re-usable, we are thrilled to partner with Open Knowledge Foundation and the Frictionless Data team to enhance our submission processes. Integrating the Frictionless Data toolkit, Dryad will be able to directly provide feedback to authors on the structure of tabular files uploaded. This will also allow for automated file level metadata to be created at upload and available for download for published datasets.

We are excited to get moving on this project and with support from the Sloan Foundation, Open Knowledge Foundation has just announced a job opening to contribute to this work. Please check out the posting and circulate it to any developers who may be interested in building out this functionality with us: https://okfn.org/about/jobs/

Call for Nominations: Dryad Scientific Advisory Committee

Dryad was founded over a decade ago by researchers who called for an open, accessible home for research data to be curated, archived and published. Since its founding, Dryad has long been rooted in researcher values, led by and serving various scientific communities. 

In recent discussions, and raised at a recent NSF supported workshop focusing on researcher perspectives, it has become clear that beyond our governing, Dryad should have a committee of scientists across disciplines and career stages who can advise on Dryad’s strategic directions and provide expert advice on field standards.

We are pleased to announce a call for nominations for the inaugural Dryad Scientific Advisory Committee. As Dryad’s current and future users include a broad diversity of individuals, disciplines of study, geographies, career stages and backgrounds, this Scientific Advisory Committee will reflect that global and diverse perspective, and operate using inclusive participation practices. This group will meet quarterly, provide feedback on strategic plans or initiatives and be an advocate for Dryad as well as relay community concerns to Dryad’s leadership. The time commitment involved will be 10-20 hours over the course of the year. 

Please consider nominating a colleague or yourself here. We ask in the nomination process that you please consider current or emerging leaders in their field of study and voices that may not already be represented in the open science community.

Dryad Scientific Advisory Committee Nomination Form

Questions? Please contact Dryad Executive Director Tracy Teal <director@datadryad.org>

Deadline for nominations is 2020 October 30 Anywhere On Earth, but we know there’s a lot going on right now, so nominations will still be accepted past this date.

Welcoming new board members and thanking outgoing members

As a community organization, Dryad is governed by a board elected by its members. We are pleased to share that several individuals will be joining the Dryad Board of Directors. Their addition to the board will help to continue to position the organization as a critical leader in data sharing and publishing. 

Dryad Board members serve a 3 year term and volunteer their time and energy to directly impact our community and our organization. The 12-member rotating Board aims for both diversity of perspective and depth of expertise, and a strength is that with our staggered terms, the Board is always changing. Our new Board of Directors were nominated by the governance committee and voted onto the board by the Dryad membership. We thank our outgoing members and welcome new members, as well as extend a heartfelt thanks to Directors past, present, and future for their contributions and dedication to Dryad’s mission.

Farewell to Outgoing Board Members

Emilio Bruna has served on the Dryad board for two terms, totalling 6 years. He has provided consistent and thoughtful guidance from a researcher and journal editor perspective and been committed to expanding access to data sharing, particularly in South America. 

Jennifer Lin served on the board for two terms, serving as chair of the board in 2017-2018 and secretary in 2016-2017. She helped guide the organization through several transitions, and brought a broad perspective on publishing, non-profit structure, governance and change management. We have appreciated and are grateful for her insight, ideas, dedication and advocacy for Dryad during her time on the board. 

Brian Hole most recently served as Treasurer for Dryad’s Board. He has provided invaluable fiscal oversight and perspective to the organization through his time on the board, and we’re grateful for his work. 

Carly Strasser served one term on the board, and we’re grateful for her guidance and perspective as a researcher, working in the funding space and involvement in developing and advocating for open data practices and principles. 

After two terms on the board, Chuck Fox moved to an ex officio capacity on the board last year, this year stepping off the board. In addition to his 7 years of service and leadership, including as chair, secretary and three years as treasurer, in an ex officio capacity he has provided key perspective on the organization and continued to help guide its future. 

We are truly grateful to these outgoing members who have volunteered their time to guide Dryad, dedicating significant time and energy to help chart our past, present and future and grow Dryad as a sustainable and community-oriented organization.

Welcome to New Board Members

We also want to congratulate and welcome to the Board four new members, along with Fiona Murphy as a re-elected member. We are grateful and excited to have this group of individuals join the board and bring their unique talents, expertise and perspectives to the work of the organization in order to further our vision of promoting a world where research data is openly available and routinely re-used to create knowledge.  Below are bios of each of our newest members.

Scott Edmunds is Editor-in-Chief for GigaScience, a self-proclaimed data nerd, and an Executive Committee member for Open Data Hong Kong. He has co-founded Citizen Science organisations Bauhinia Genome and CitizenScience.Asia and also teaches data management and curation at Hong Kong University. His academic background includes training in Biochemistry at Imperial College and a PhD on the Molecular Pathology of Ocular Melanoma at the Royal London Hospital, where his research mainly focused on Cancer Cell and Molecular Biology. After postdoctoral positions on Cancer Molecular Pathology at the WHO International Agency for Research in Cancer in Lyon and Institute of Cell and Molecular Sciences in London (Queen Mary) he was senior scientific editor for the BMC Genomics and Bioinformatics journals at BioMed Central before moving in 2010 to Shenzhen/Hong Kong to set up the GigaScience journal and GigaDB database for the BGI (the world’s largest genomic organisation). Working with the British Library and DataCite, GigaScience published its first data (the genome of the deadly German outbreak strain of E. coli) in June 2011. 

Brooks Hanson serves as the Executive Vice President for Science for the American Geophysical Union (AGU). He’s responsible for overseeing AGU’s publications, meetings, and ethics programs and Thriving Earth Exchange and coordinating science activities across these. He served previously as Sr. Vice President for Publications at AGU, responsible for AGU’s portfolio of many books and 20 journals and their editorial operations, helping set overall editorial policies, and leading future developments. Before arriving at AGU, he served as the Deputy Editor for Physical Sciences at Science and earlier as an editor at Science. Brooks has a Ph.D. in Geology from UCLA and held a post-doctoral appointment at the Department of Mineral Sciences, Smithsonian Institution. His main areas or research and publications span the tectonics of the western U.S., metamorphic petrology, modeling magmatic and hydrothermal processes, and on scholarly publishing. He is a fellow of the Geological Society of American and Mineralogical Society of America.

Judy Ruttenberg is the Director of Scholars and Scholarship at the Association of Research Libraries. With more than twenty years of experience working in and on behalf of academic and research libraries, Ruttenberg’s expertise is in scholarly communication and collections, collaboration, and strategic partnerships. Ruttenberg is currently working with a committee of ARL deans and directors, a team of ARL staff, and key partners in the research and learning community to advance open science by design within research institutions. An experienced project leader, Ruttenberg recently co-directed an IMLS and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation-funded initiative on open, linked, interoperable metadata called SHARE, of which Dryad was a participating repository. She is particularly focused on research data policy and governance, and on strengthening relationships between data curators within universities and federal agencies.

Jason Williams is Assistant Director, External Collaborations at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory DNA Learning Center where he develops national biology education programs. Jason leads education, outreach, and training for CyVerse (US national cyberinfrastructure for the life sciences) and has trained thousands of students, researchers and educators in bioinformatics, data science, and molecular biology. Jason’s focus has been developing bioinformatics in undergraduate education and career-spanning learning for biologists. Jason’s “Reinventing Scientific Talent” proposal was a winning entry in the US National Science Foundation’s NSF 2026 Idea Machine search for the next set of “Big Ideas”; proposals that will shape funding priorities for the foundation. Jason is founder of LifeSciTrainers.org – a global effort to promote community of practice among professionals who develop short-format training for life scientists. Jason is also a member of and has chaired science advisory boards in the US, UK, and Australia, and is a former chair of the Software Carpentry Foundation. In 2020, Jason was recognized as a US National Academy of Sciences Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow. Jason is also a teacher at the Yeshiva University High School for Girls.

Thank you to all who serve on the board, and we look forward to working together to advance Dryad’s mission. 

Institutional Membership Webinar – October 1, 2020

Over the last year, Dryad has built upon our existing publisher and funder member community to include institutions globally who are interested in supporting best practice data publishing for their researchers. We invite you to join us on October 1st to learn more about our institutional membership, and hear from three institutional members on their unique perspectives and experiences with Dryad. The webinar will include a broader discussion about researcher needs, especially in the current landscape, and include time for Q&A with the panel.

The webinar is geared towards anyone interested in learning more how Dryad membership is working at a variety of institutions, and relevant for a variety of audiences, including…

  • Research managers
  • Librarians
  • Research IT 
  • Campus research groups 
  • Universities/colleges interested in learning more.  

Please join us!

When: Thursday, October 1st @ 8am PST / 11am EST / 3pm GMT

Featured Panel:

  • Jeanine Finn, Data Science & Digital Scholarship Coordinator, The Claremont Colleges
  • John Borghi, Research & Instruction Manager, Lane Medical Library, Stanford University
  • Karl Benedict, Director of Research Data Services/Director of IT, University of New Mexico

Registration: https://tinyurl.com/DryadMembershipWebinar 

For those who are interested in joining but cannot make it, we will post a recording following the event for those who are registered. We look forward to seeing you on October 1st! 

Open Source Community Call

Join the Open Source Community Call co-hosted by Dryad, FORCE11 and eLife on September 29th, 3pm UTC (8am PDT, 11am EDT, 4pm BST)

Innovators share the latest updates and opportunities in the open-source space for research communication and publishing. Representatives from open source projects present in a ‘lightning talk’ format, 5 minutes or less, to share about projects and communities that are emerging or underway, so we can learn more about available open resources, where we can engage or contribute and consider where collaboration can contribute to the path forward.

Presenters include SherAaron Hurt from The Carpentries, Laura Acion from MetaDocencia, Matt Turk from Whole Tale, Arfon Smith from Journal of Open Source Software, Lou Woodley from Center for Scientific Collaboration and Community Engagement, Sara El-Gebali from OpenCIDER and Mackenzie Mathis from DeepLabCuts!

Registration is free! Please register at the event registration page.

Open Source Community calls are co-hosted by Dryad, eLife and FORCE11 to foster collaboration and raise awareness of open resources, practices and communities in the research publishing space.

Sustainable, Open Source Alternatives Exist

Authors: Dryad (Tracy Teal, Daniella Lowenberg) & Zenodo (Tim Smith, Jose Benito Gonzales, Lars Holm Nielsen, Alex Ioannidis)

Crossposted at Zenodo

Recently, the 4TU.ResearchData team published a blog post on their decision to take a commercial route through their repository tender process. As allies in the community, we are glad to know they have found a path forward that fits their needs. Discussions and analyses about scholarly communications infrastructure are important to ensure we’re exploring all options of technical, community and governance structures. There are tradeoffs, challenges, and opportunities in each situation, and each organization needs to make its own decisions based on their own set of constraints. Specifically, organizations need to consider resourcing in thinking about a hosted solution or maintaining infrastructure themselves. 

In furthering this conversation, we want to respond to their post, with concerns about several statements that inaccurately represent the ecosystem and organizations who have long supported open source infrastructure for research data.  The blog’s central question is: “We need sustainable long-term open source alternatives, who will that be?” Our answer is that these infrastructure do exist and we aim to correct this messaging, shining light on those that have long served as these sustainable, open, alternatives. 

As the organizations identified in the post: Dryad and CERN’s Digital Repositories Team responsible for InvenioRDM and Zenodo, we feel that the authors have overlooked the strong communities and infrastructure built up in both of our Dryad and CERN worlds over the last decade. There was an implication in the post that the decision was made around features and capabilities, whereas it was the structure of the process that excluded non-commercial open source solutions. Both of our teams met, separately and briefly (a single 1-hour meeting), with the 4TU.ResearchData team in 2019. Our takeaways were similar: the tender process was not one in which we would be able to compete, so we did not continue conversations. The decision was not made because of features, pilot-phases, or other product judgements. Our organizations were not represented in the tender process because the framework of this organizational decision-making processes, specifically, the bureaucracy of the tender process, presented a number of challenges eliminating us from the competition. These same challenges, which are faced by other  nonprofits and government agencies, inherently favor commercial entities that are well-suited to go through the process.

Another implication in the post was that hosted solutions and open source software are mutually exclusive, which is not the case. Dryad is a hosted open-source community that institutions, publishers, and funders utilize. Additionally, many commercial entities run their technology on open source solutions (e.g., Haplo and TIND). It serves only to further discredit the success of open source infrastructure if we do not acknowledge the backbone role various systems play across the repository and open research space.

We appreciate that there is now broader support for community infrastructure like ours. IOI is an example of an organization in this space looking to support and synthesize infrastructure. As supporters of research from all aspects of the process – institutions, funders, publishers, etc, it is important that we continue to boost the open-source communities that researchers have owned and adopted for many years. Additionally, we need to consider barriers to participation in a selection process. We have to question: if processes like the tender exclude these solutions, is the tender process the best way to reach a decision for how institutions can best support their community and researchers? Instead of focusing on creating new infrastructure, or disregarding the existence of current supported infrastructure, we should be partnering to find ways to better the workflows and repositories in place to support open research. 

Sustainable, open source alternatives for open research infrastructure not only exist but also thrive. Processes that disfavour non-commercial platforms and communities will continue to feed this cycle of questioning the sustainability of our well-adopted and researcher-supported platforms and illogically promote belief that commercial solutions are more sustainable and well suited to meet researcher needs. Rather than masking these decisions with feature comparisons, not being fully transparent about the challenges and politics presented, we should adopt accessible processes that promote all options that can best meet open science goals, and not knock down the well supported ecosystem that exists along the way.

Looking ahead: a letter from our Executive Director

Just over three months into my role as Dryad Executive Director, I’m reflecting on my transition and what I’ve learned so far – what we’ve been doing and where we’re planning to go next in our programmatic work as well as organizational capacity and sustainability planning. But this transition has been more than just a new role for me, it comes at a time when as a scientific community we’re reflecting on our responsibilities, who our systems serve and who they don’t, our collaborations, what it means to work and share openly and our capacity to work together to do better together. This moment demands our attention and our focus, but these challenges and opportunities require more than short-term commitments. We need to continue to reflect and build, not just something that meets this moment, but that will sustain and move us forward towards our vision of sharing data and working together to create knowledge for science and society. Rather than just reacting, we can respond with intention – evaluating, supporting and re-envisioning our systems and our communities.  

Previously as Executive Director of The Carpentries, I worked with the community to create inclusive training, teaching people to work effectively with data and code, in a movement to empower all people to answer questions that are important to them. In that work, I noticed that another missing piece is access to the data to answer those questions. We need to both bring people to data and bring data to people, to democratize data, for each moment, each crisis, each person, each challenge and each opportunity. This is only work that can be accomplished if all researchers, organizations and institutions work together – sharing knowledge, creating pathways and connections and building relationships. Through my work as a researcher, with The Carpentries and now with Dryad, I’ve had the great opportunity of meeting many members of the data community, and while we have challenges in front of us, I am inspired by the commitment of so many to affect change and look forward to continuing these conversations and work within the Dryad community. 

Dryad’s connections 

Dryad is researcher-led and open, both in its publishing, and in its community, qualities that drew me to the organization. What I’ve continued to learn about Dryad in the last few months is that Dryad’s alignment with the scientific community and those promoting open, curated data publications enable us to focus on how to curate and publish quality datasets, at scale. I believe that part of the reason Dryad has seen such success in the last years, is by building like-minded partnerships and collaborations over its tenure. Working closely with those that hold similar values like the National Science Foundation, institutional resources (e.g., NESCent), the Data Curation Network, and now our partnerships with California Digital Library and Zenodo, we can have an even more effective reach in the scientific community. Going forward, it’s important to think not just about submitting data, but about listening and working together to pioneer new ways of making data re-use more prevalent and accessible.

Curation at our core

These ideals are heavily reflected in our data publishing platform, but also in our curation emphasis. To promote and publish FAIR data, it is essential that Dryad maintains its roots in curation, even if how curation looks may differ from Dryad’s inception. I’m finding that as the community shifts to value curation, we need to question what quality curation practices look like at multi-disciplinary repositories. Disciplinary repositories have long supported detailed curation, specific to the type of data being submitted. At Dryad, we need to assess what quality looks like at our scale and across disciplines, thinking about what level of checks are appropriate and attainable, and adjust both our workflows and the community’s expectations. We cannot do this alone.

In my first 90 days I have had the opportunity to learn from and share my experience at multiple venues spanning from the NIH’s General Repository workshop, meetings with the Data Curation Network, and more recently at the Open Publishing Fest with colleagues at Wormbase. In my next 90 days, I look forward to continuing to work with these groups and more that are interested in quality curation at scale, and how to implement this in a way that is accessible to researchers. 

Going forward

Dryad has and will continue to maintain broad researcher support, and as the current climate has increased a spotlight on the importance of data publishing, I want to take a moment to outline how I think Dryad can improve to more effectively publish FAIR, re-usable, data, and where we can go next.

It is essential that Dryad remains focused on researcher-adoption of best practices for open data publishing. We’ve seen this adoption, with increased submissions annually, and more stories of data re-use, and it’s important that as research evolves we evolve with the scientists and broaden our diversity of perspectives. Our platform and partnerships are focused on seamless workflows to accommodate increased submissions and we are very excited about the upcoming integrations with journal submission systems and Zenodo.

With increased submissions and an emphasis on adoption, we will need to continue to optimize for quality and volume. Dryad has done this successfully over the last ten years, and going forward, I will be investigating the right level of curation and resources required for the growing scale. This may mean investing more in automated FAIR checking, tools for researcher education during the submission process, and considering the role of institutional data curators looking to steward their research outputs. 

Beyond these operational improvements, it is important for Dryad to continue to push the envelope in data publishing. Ten years ago, Dryad was critical in supporting the development of data policies at publishers. Data availability statements and having a place to house data will always be important. But, growing and evolving with researchers means putting a larger emphasis on data re-use and equitable access, as data-driven discovery gains traction and researchers are eager to broaden the impact of their research through data publications. We need to consider how to make data re-use more accessible, thinking about how this practice can be promoted and encouraging best practices.

The research data community has given me a warm welcome, and it is a community that I am thrilled to be a part of. I am privileged to have the opportunity to steward Dryad into the future as a trusted multi-disciplinary data repository. Today’s challenges continue to show the importance of collective impact, working together towards a shared goal, and the essential value of backbone organizations in open data. Dryad has played and will continue to play a leading role in the research data ecosystem.  We have important work to do together, and as challenging as the current times are, it’s also shown people’s instincts to help each other. Thinking about how to better operationalize Dryad, to better support researchers in data curation, publishing, sharing and re-use, is something that I cannot do alone, and I am very excited and grateful to continue working with our staff, partners and the larger community to go further together.

Thank you Elizabeth! Our Associate Director moving on to new opportunities

In 2014 Elizabeth Hull stepped into the basement office of NESCent at Duke University to begin working with Dryad as a curator. Since then Elizabeth has worked in almost every role in the organization, leading curation efforts, business operations, communications, team building, writing grants, answering thousands of emails on HelpDesk, Interim Executive Director, Associate Director and most importantly connecting with so many researchers, librarians and publishers in our community. After so many years of service as a steward of Dryad and leader of the team, Elizabeth has decided to move on to new opportunities. 

As a team, we want to share our gratitude for her leadership, commitment, strength and grace under pressure and how she has welcomed and supported us all as team members. We will miss her work with Dryad, and her as a person on our team. 

As our Board Chair Caroline Sutton recently commented: “our continued presence as Dryad is a testament to Elizabeth’s standing in the community and among our staff as well as her skills and dedication.”

We know Elizabeth has supported, welcomed, talked with and listened to so many in our community over the years and made a significant impact. Please share any of your own notes or thank you’s with us or with her directly. 

Thank you Elizabeth, and we wish you all the best in your next endeavors!

Facilitating data sharing in times of crisis

Dryad has long committed to the sharing of open data, supporting authors in depositing data and providing FAIR curation to improve metadata and data quality. We believe this mission is important always, supporting the advancement of science, but in light of the current public health crisis related to COVID-19 we see the need for extra rapid curation and publication of pandemic related datasets. This public health crisis has changed the way we work as a society and has also changed scientific needs for rapid dissemination and analysis of research data and publications.

Amidst the COVID-19 outbreak we have seen amazing examples of the value of open data as well as the challenges of data variety, identifying sources and aggregating information. So many in the scientific community are putting exemplary energy and work into these efforts including Our World in Data, Nextstrain, The COVID Tracking project, GISAID and the GO FAIR Virus Outbreak Data Network to name just a few. These efforts are a tribute to scientists – as scientists and as people.

It is imperative that the community rapidly disseminate datasets related to COVID-19, and we must acknowledge that data quality is variable. Access to research data is critical, but it’s also essential that data are accompanied by high-quality metadata that can facilitate more effective and efficient reuse. Datasets need to be understood, checked and cleaned for personally identifiable information, standard metadata and accessible file types. Curation checks, while a slight delay in publication, can improve data quality for easier reuse and overall speed of the rate and quality of analyses.

During times of crisis when labs have closed down, we understand that many researchers are working with their previously collected data, applying computational approaches, analyzing or evaluating open datasets from other labs, and continuing to turn these data into knowledge. Dryad will continue to curate and publish all incoming research datasets, supporting all domains of research. 

We are also ever-conscious of the needs for rapid data curation and publication, and we are taking extra steps within the current climate to look out for public health, economic, sociologic and other datasets related to the pandemic. We are committed to working with the research community, including publishers and preprint providers, to facilitate the rapid and high-quality curation review and publication of any pandemic related data. Don’t hesitate to reach out. We’re here to help.

This is one crisis that has the world’s attention that requires rapid, coordinated response. But there are so many other moments that are important in individual communities, to specific topics, or to global challenges that may not seem as fast moving, such as climate change. In all of these moments, data sharing that is efficient and data we can trust is crucial. At Dryad we are thinking about our current practices, as well as what we can learn for future situations, curating and publishing datasets, so we can all continue to go further together.

Dryad & Zenodo: Our Path Ahead

In July, 2019 we were proud to announce a funded partnership between Dryad and Zenodo. Today, we are excited to give an update on our future together. 

Dryad and Zenodo have both been leading the way in open-source data, software, and other research outputs publishing for the last decade. While our focus and adoption mechanisms may have been different, we’ve had similar values and goals all along: publish and archive non-traditional research outputs in an open and accessible way that promotes best practices. 

In looking to expand our capacities for sharing data and software, it became clear that we could each benefit from the other’s expertise. Dryad has long focused on research data, curating each dataset published, and working in close coordination with publishers and societies to support journal data policies. Zenodo, based at CERN, builds on strong infrastructure capacity and has focused on software publishing and citation. It was clear that by working together, leveraging each other’s expertise, we could better achieve our goals.

Notably, we believe researchers should have an opportunity to publish curated data, software, and other research outputs at a trusted, open source set of repositories in a seamless way.

At the beginning of February, we brought our two teams together to understand the repository systems, roadmaps, and to map our work ahead. We have broken down this work into a couple of segments and will be beginning with our first project, as noted on our Github, as “DJ D-Zed: Mixing Up Repositories”. In other words, we will be integrating our two systems to lower the barrier for researchers who want to follow best practices publishing their software, data, and supporting information. The first direction of focus is publishing from Dryad to Zenodo.

Image from iOS

So, what does it all look like?

This project entails re-imagining the Dryad upload interface to expand the scope of upload to accommodate researchers uploading more than data. Within this interface, through a series of declarations and machine reading, we will triage data, software, and supporting (other) files. Data should be curated and published at Dryad. Software requires a series of different license options, metadata, and other attributes and supporting files benefit from a previewer, so these files are more appropriately published at Zenodo. 

After curation, once the items are ready to be published, it is essential that we can link up the work with their DOIs and citations to both. As Dryad and Zenodo each mint DOIs for published works, it is our responsibility to expose the relationship between the software, data, and other citations so users can find all related work. The benefit of having separate citations for software and data will allow for more specified citation practices at journals, in preprints, etc. 

Image from iOS copy

It is essential that we acknowledge the importance of user testing. We have identified our minimum viable product, but the look and feel of this relies on close collaboration with our user experience teams and researcher user testing. This integration can only succeed if researchers find the benefits of using one entry point for two repositories, and are educated along the way about best practices for data and software. We’ll be planning opportunities for feedback at specific milestones, and appreciate comments via email or github comments along the way. 

What happens next

Our partnership relies on cross-organization co-development. Our teams have been spending time to understand how Dryad and Zenodo both function to ensure we are building for success for each of our user communities. Our initial user testing is about to ramp up, and we have begun the exploration into backend development to tie our systems closer together. As avid open-source supporters, all of our work will be tracked publicly on Github. Our code and documentation will also be available as new features are released.

User testing our workflows with researchers will help guide our development, but we also need to understand how this work can support Dryad and Zenodo’s larger communities: institutions, libraries, publishers, societies, funding agencies, and others that have a stake in research data and software publishing. We will have regular opportunities for feedback and we hope you will weigh in.

Check out our blogs for updates as well as our Twitter to hear about upcoming meetings we will be presenting at. And If you have feedback please as always get in touch with our Product Managers at Dryad and Zenodo.