UCP logoDryad is very pleased to announce a new partnership with the University of Chicago Press – Journals Division. Founded in 1890, Chicago is one of the oldest and currently the largest continuously operating university press in the United States. Chicago has recently integrated two additional journals with Dryad: Physiological and Biochemical Zoology (PBZ) and International Journal of Plant Sciences (IJPS) and is sponsoring Data Publication Charges (DPCs) for both titles. PBZ and IJPS join sister publication, The American Naturalist, a Dryad partner since its inception.

Integration with Dryad

  • Ensures bidirectional links between the article and the data, and increased visibility for both
  • Simplifies the process of data submission for authors
  • Takes advantage of Dryad’s professional curators who perform basic checks to ensure discoverability and proper metadata
  • Ensures that the data is freely accessible once the article becomes available online

Physiological and Biochemical Zoology publishes original research in the areas of animal physiology and biochemistry. PBZ focuses on ecological, evolutionary and behavioral aspects of morphological, physiological, and biochemical mechanisms. PBZ’s integration will allow authors to make their data available to journal editors during peer review.

The International Journal of Plant Sciences has been publishing plant science research since 1875. IJPS covers a wide range of topics including genetics and genomics, developmental and cell biology, biochemistry and physiology, morphology and anatomy, systematics, evolution, paleobotany, ecology, and plant-microbe interactions. IJPS will accept data from authors at the time of article acceptance.

The University of Chicago Press – Journals Division is increasing its commitment to authors and the STM field by making it easy to publish datasets alongside the manuscript, and by taking the extra step of covering the cost of data publication on behalf of authors. To learn more about journal integration with Dryad and DPCs, contact us.

Did you ever wonder what goes on behind the scenes when Dryad curators review data files submitted by authors?  There are no wizards behind our curtains, just real live information specialists and trained data curators.

by Kaptain Kobold via Flickr

by Kaptain Kobold via Flickr

Dryad’s curation process is intentionally lightweight, so it doesn’t delay the availability of the data. Curators don’t review the scientific merit of the files – that is left to peer reviewers and the scientific community. Instead, we rely on our curators’ expertise in library and information science to ensure the integrity and preservation of the data.

Curators perform basic checks on each submission (can the files be opened? are they free of copyright restrictions? do they appear to be free of sensitive data?). The completeness and correctness of the metadata is checked and the DOI is officially registered. During their work, Dryad curators encounter thousands of data files in any number of file formats. Our team examines all of these data files to ensure they do, in fact, include data, and not manuscripts, or pictures of kittens.

Curators may communicate directly with submitters to address issues and/or to make suggestions about enhancing the description and reusability of the data package. They can also create new versions of data packages should corrections or additions be needed after archiving. Ultimately, the responsibility for the content of the files rests with the submitters, but Dryad’s curators can help to catch and fix many common problems – and some rare ones, too.

fileTypes_wordleSince Dryad’s inception, curation operations have been led by the Metadata Research Center (or MRC) directed by Dr. Jane Greenberg, initially at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and now at Drexel University. The team is supervised by Senior Curator Erin Clary, and currently includes all students in, or graduates of, Library and Information Science (LIS) or Informatics Master’s programs.

So, (wizard) hats off to all our behind-the-curtains data curators, whose vital contributions ensure that the data in the repository is findable and usable. If you have a question about Dryad curation or need advice on preparing your data for archiving, don’t hesitate to email us at curator@datadryad.org.

We are pleased to announce that The Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) now sponsors Data Publication Charges (DPCs) through Dryad’s voucher plan, which enables an organization to prepay DPCs at a discounted rate on behalf of its researchers.

nioo_logo_212wThe Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) is a unique ‘all ecologist institute’ covering animal, plant, and microbial ecology on land and in water. NIOO has about 220 employees, students and guests, making it one of the largest research institutes of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW). Its core task is to perform basic and strategic ecological research on individual organisms, populations, ecological communities and ecosystems.


A recent paper by NIOO researchers analyzes the transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus in mallards (van Dijk JGB et al., 2014, PLoS ONE http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0112595; Data: http://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.43v0t). Image: Ingrid Taylar, CC-BY 2.0, https://www.flickr.com/photos/taylar/14129117924

By becoming an institutional sponsor with Dryad, the Institute can be confident that the valuable datasets produced by its researchers are securely preserved, discoverable, citable, and prominently linked with their publications. The researchers also benefit from an easy, cost-free submission process and the added curation that Dryad provides to all its content.

Dryad provides a home for nearly any type of data associated with a peer-reviewed article, book or book chapter, dissertation, thesis or other vetted publication. Dryad’s voucher plan provides institutions with an easy way to support the data management needs of their researchers without requiring additional infrastructure or an exclusive arrangement. If you would like to learn more about how your organization can partner with Dryad, please contact us.

We are delighted to announce the integration of three new journals: The Bone & Joint Journal, Bone & Joint Research and Bone & Joint360.


The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery is a not-for-profit charity formed in 1953 for “the advancement and improvement of education in orthopaedic surgery and allied branches of surgery,” achieved through publication of The Bone & Joint Journal (formerly known as JBJS (Br)). With all three journals, authors should submit the data to Dryad after the manuscript has been accepted.

Please see here for more information about how your journal can integrate manuscript and data submission to Dryad.


Our latest featured data package is from Alexandra Swanson and colleagues at the Snapshot Serengeti project, and accompanies their peer-reviewed article in Scientific Data.  It provides a unique resource for studying one of the world’s most extraordinary mammal assemblages and also for studies of computer vision and machine learning. In addition, data from Snapshot Serengeti is already being used in biology and computer science classrooms to enable students to work on solving real problems with authentic research data.


Snapshot Serengeti, CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

The raw data (which are being made available from the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute) consist of 1.2 million sets of images collected between February 2011 and May 2013 from 225 heat and motion triggered cameras, operating day and night, distributed over 1,135 sq. km. in Serengeti National Park in Tanzania.  This staggering trove of images was classified by 28,040 registered and ~40,000 unregistered volunteers on Snapshot Serengeti (a Zooniverse project) according to the species present (if any), the number of individuals, the presence of young, and what behaviors were being displayed, such as standing, resting, moving, eating, or interacting.

Remarkably, this vast army of citizen scientists was classifying the images faster than they were being produced, and each image set was classified on average by nine different volunteers.  This led to consensus classifications with high accuracy, 96.6% for species identifications relative to an expert-classified gold set.  Of the more than 300,000 image sets that contain animals, 48 different species were seen, including rare mammals such as the aardwolf and the zorilla.


zorilla (image from Snapshot Serengeti CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

The Dryad data package includes the classifications from all the individual volunteers, the consensus classifications, information about when each camera was operational, and the expert classification of 4,149 image sets as a gold standard.


  • Swanson et al. (2015) Snapshot Serengeti, high frequency annotated camera trap images of 40 mammalian species in an African savannah. Scientific Data.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sdata.2015.26
  • Swanson et al. (2015) Data from: Snapshot Serengeti, high frequency annotated camera trap images of 40 mammalian species in an African savannah. Dryad Digital Repository http://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.5pt92

We invite you to register for the 2015 Dryad Community Meeting, which will take place on May 27th from 8:30am-4:00pm in Washington, DC.  The theme of this year’s meeting is “Taking a Closer Look at Data”, featuring a keynote presentation from Brian Nosek of the Center for Open Science.

The Community Meeting brings together researchers, librarians, publishers, funders and other individuals and organizations with a stake in the preservation and availability of the scientific and medical data associated with the published literature.

The program includes:

  • Dryad101, an introduction to the Dryad Digital Repository, including an overview of recent and upcoming developments
  • A Community Perspectives Forum in which partner journals and member organizations have an opportunity to share their experiences with data publishing.
  • The annual Dryad Business Meeting during which stakeholders can have a say in the governance of the nonprofit organization.
  • An Emerging Issues panel discussion all about the concept of “data review”.  This is an opportunity to hear about the experiences of the community with various forms of data review and to consider whether and how data review may be more widely adopted by Dryad’s community in the future to improve the value of data for reuse.

Our keynote speaker, Dr. Brian Nosek is Professor, Department of Psychology at the University of Virginia and Director, Center for Open Science. The Center for Open Science is a nonprofit technology startup that aims to increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility of scientific research. He is also co-founder of the widely known Project Implicit.


There is no cost for registration, but space is limited, so please register early to ensure availability.

For inquiries, please contact Meredith Morovati (mmorovati@datadryad.org), Executive Director.

mm3We are delighted to introduce Meredith Morovati to the Dryad community. Meredith assumed the role of Executive Director in late 2014, and now that she has had a few months to settle in, we thought this would be a good time to check in with her and hear about her plans for the organization. Before joining Dryad, Meredith was the Vice President of Membership for the American Society of Echocardiography. Her experience prior to that includes stints in the publishing world. with Oxford University Press and Blackwell.

You’ve been on the job just over three months. What has been your impression of Dryad so far?
MM: Dryad is driven by a team of passionate and informed curators, developers, scientists and board members. I have been incredibly impressed by the staff’s commitment and how much they care about what they do. Everyone recognizes that Dryad is not only providing a service, but helping to shape the very landscape of data publishing, which is great to be a part of.

What excites you about this position and how does it build on your prior professional experiences?
MM: I am delighted to be able to apply my experience with academic boards and non-profit management to an organization that is positioned to grow dramatically in the near future. Data publication poses many challenges, yet has so much value to offer to researchers, publishers, librarians, and all of us who benefit from quality scientific and medical research. I am excited to be surrounded by informed and passionate individuals and to put my experience to work making data publication mainstream and sustainable.

What do you see as your top priorities for Dryad?
MM: I see an important role in removing barriers to the natural growth of Dryad’s service, and continuing to build relationships with its diversity of stakeholders. I believe there is a lot more work to be done talking to research communities in different corners of science and medicine on the imperative for data publication and how Dryad can be part of the solution. Dryad is integrated with many well-known journals and has some very prestigious and committed members. But there are many more to whom we need to make the case that data publication is valuable, achievable, and sustainable, and that Dryad is a key piece to that puzzle. Another big part of my job in the coming year will be to getting to know our members and hearing from them about how we can continue to improve the services we provide, both through the repository and through the other activities of the organization.

What can Dryad’s members and users expect to see in the coming year?
MM: First, I think members and users will be impressed with how much Dryad grows and diversifies this year. We are continually integrating manuscript and data submission with new journals, and the diversity of data packages we are now publishing can be seen by those we feature on nearly a daily basis on our social media channels. We are also pleased to be seeing a trend toward having a greater share of articles with data in Dryad from many of our partner journals.

Another trend that we hope will continue is more journals providing their reviewers with access to the draft Dryad data package. I believe that when reviewers pay attention to the data, it will naturally lead to higher quality, more reusable content.

As we grow, we are also working to increase the pool of sponsors, so that submission of data will be free to a greater share of those submitting data to the repository. There are a number of features in the works that will allow stakeholder organizations to see what has been published from the publications and researchers they care about, and how much attention and usage that data is getting, which we hope will make the benefits of sponsorship more apparent.

There’s a lot of work going on behind the scenes to streamline the curation process while continuing to provide personalized user support where needed. This work will allow us to continue scaling up the number of data packages we publish without compromising the attention each one receives.

We expect researchers will also appreciate the enhancements we are making to the data submission experience. We are particularly excited about the upcoming rollout of ORCiDs, which among other things will make it easier for coauthors to collaborate on data packages.


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