Welcoming the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to Our Member Community

We are proud to welcome our first philanthropy to join the Dryad member community: Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI).

By joining Dryad, CZI will cover the cost of curation and preservation for their grantees’  data publications, supporting them in following best practices for open data.

“The discoverability and availability of research data is a critical component of an open, reproducible, and verifiable scientific ecosystem, and Dryad provides essential infrastructure in support of this mission. The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is pleased to join the Dryad community.”

– Alex Wade, Open Science Program Manager (CZI)

We are thrilled that CZI will be joining publishers and institutional members in lowering the barrier for researchers to publish their curated research data. For more information about our memberships and to join the community, get in touch.

Institutional member round-up and shout-out

As we settle in to the new year, we’re thrilled to report that Dryad’s institutional member community continues to expand and diversify. This should only pick up steam as we welcome our new Executive Director Dr. Tracy Teal next month, who brings significant community-building experience.

We applaud these new Dryad members in their efforts to support data stewardship and research on their campuses and beyond:

* (our first Australian institutional members!)

The Twitterverse seems excited by these developments:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

To join as an institutional member, contact us today!

Deep Roots & Strong Branches: A Recap and Preview of Dryad’s Development Plans

Happy 2020! Kicking off the new year, our product development team wanted to take a moment to introduce our development processes and provide a glimpse into Dryad’s future directions. 2019 was an exciting year with our growth of 15% in submissions and the release of our new Dryad. This release was the culmination of a year and a half of work building a new, combined product development team (at Dryad and CDL) and developing new features to support Dryad’s user base. Since then, the work has not stopped. Our team has been working to continually meet user needs and better our services. 

Image from iOS.jpg

Members of the Product Development Team launching the new Dryad in September, 2019 (Left to Right: Daniella Lowenberg, Ryan Scherle, Marisa Strong, Scott Fisher, Brian Riley)

 

The Dryad development process

The Dryad product development team follows agile methodologies, working and releasing in  two-week sprints. This means we prioritize feature development and bug fixes based on user needs (which are ever evolving). This work is tracked on our public project board here.  Feature development also includes working with our user experience team to design interfaces that are both accessible for and understood by our users. Outward-facing features are tested for specific user groups (researchers, curators, members, etc) before development and before each release. At the end of each sprint, we post our release notes covering at a high (and sometimes technical) level what was completed. 

This type of development work means that we depend on community feedback to help identify the features necessary for making data publishing as easy as possible and for ensuring that published datasets are usable. There are hundreds of features we would love to build or enhance, and hearing productive feedback from the community helps to guide our development priorities. If you have a feature request, or would like to report a bug, you may log a ticket here. Our product manager consistently grooms through cards and will be in touch with more questions when that work is prioritized.

What we’ve been building

In the last three months, we have been primarily focused on ensuring the new platform can support the growing Dryad community. This means building up a robust, accessible platform and enhancing researcher facing features.

One of Dryad’s key strengths is its high adoption rate. This means that the platform receives heavy traffic loads. To support these loads over the long term and as the user base grows, we have been putting in various reinforcement features like load balancing our servers, improving reliability of our downloads, and actively monitoring/blocking bots as necessary to ensure the site can avoid any downtime.

Our other development work has included addressing accessibility and feature optimization, including:

  • Adjustments to our interface to be a more accessible service for our users
  • Enhancements for the auto-fill features (journal name, institutional affiliations) to reduce lag and better the author submission process
  • Updating our DataCite schema, allowing for Dryad to send author institutional affiliations (RORs) to DataCite, enabling better tracking of dataset publications by affiliation and support consumption by initiatives like FREYA and Make Data Count.

This foundational work is key to strengthen the system and prepare for new feature development work in 2020 and beyond. 

Where we are headed

Continuing to work in our two-week sprints, we will be building essential features for the researchers using Dryad (e.g., integrations, geolocation) as well as more complex functionality for our growing institutional and publisher member communities (e.g., integrations, reporting, data metrics aggregation). We also have embarked on a couple of larger projects that we are excited to share.

  • Zenodo – Dryad Partnership: Following on our announcement in July, 2019, we have embarked on a project to integrate Zenodo and Dryad, with a goal to provide researchers with a more seamless data, code, and other materials publishing process. While the initial work has already been scoped, our official kick-off meeting is in a couple of weeks and we will update the community shortly thereafter with our project plans.
  • Editorial Manager & ScholarOne Integrations: Since many Dryad authors publish data in conjunction with an article, we have been building a direct integration with Editorial Manager, a leading journal submission platform. This work will allow for researchers submitting to a journal that uses Editorial Manager to have the option to publish their data at Dryad without actually leaving the Editorial Manager (article submission) system. We look forward to sharing more information about this implementation in the spring. We have also been working to map a similar integration with ScholarOne that will enable thousands of journals to integrate directly with Dryad.

Our open REST APIs are documented and available for use. We have been talking with undergraduate and graduate level students looking for coding projects to build integrations into our platform with R, Python, Jupyter, rOpenSci, and Binder. If you are interested in working with our APIs, get in touch!

We have a busy year ahead and we look forward to working with both researchers and research supporting communities, continuing to make data publishing as seamless as possible. Follow along our blog and twitter for further updates.

 

Tracy Teal named new Dryad ED

tracytealAfter an extensive search led by Dryad’s Board of Directors, we are proud to announce that Dr. Tracy Teal will join Dryad as Executive Director beginning February 17, 2020. She has extensive experience leading a global, community-oriented non-profit, and we’re looking forward to working with her towards Dryad’s vision of a world where research data is openly available, integrated with the scholarly literature, and routinely re-used to create knowledge.

The Board and staff are extremely pleased that Tracy will be joining Dryad and believe that her extensive experience building communities and growing membership will help Dryad continue its upward trajectory. BOD Vice-Chair Johan Nilsson states:

We are very happy to welcome Tracy as our new Executive Director. With Dryad’s partnerships with CDL and Zenodo and the recently launched institutional memberships, we have very exciting times ahead of us. We are fully confident that Tracy’s background and enthusiasm for open science makes her perfectly positioned to lead Dryad into this future.

Tracy was most recently the Executive Director of The Carpentries and a co-founder of Data Carpentry, where she helped lead the organization through growth and transition. She received her PhD in Computation and Neural Systems from California Institute of Technology and was an NSF Postdoctoral Researcher in Biological Informatics. She worked at Michigan State University as a Research Specialist with the Institute for Cyber-Enabled Research and then as an Assistant Professor in Microbiology. Throughout her career she’s been working to empower people to work with data. Tracy told us:

I am honored to be joining the Dryad team and have the opportunity to continue working to democratize data with the Dryad platform, partnerships and community. Data sharing, access and re-use as a public good is essential to the future of knowledge creation and the potential impact of data on science and society.

NSF Workshop Overview: Focusing on Researcher Perspectives

Since its founding, Dryad has hosted a researcher-led, open data publishing community and service. With the California Digital Library partnership in 2018, and reflecting on a decade of Dryad’s existence, we have spent time exploring what it means to remain a community-owned data publishing platform. By convening publishers, institutions, and other scholarly communications stakeholders to discuss the meaning of community-ownership, we have begun to understand how research-supporters see their role in the Dryad community and leadership. But to better understand the meaning of “researcher-led”, we wanted to hear about researchers’ perspectives on community-led open infrastructure. 

With the support of a National Science Foundation Community Meeting grant (award #1839032), we hosted a meeting  on October 4th, 2019, with folks from the founding Dryad research communities. Going back to our roots, gathering both researchers that founded Dryad as well as early career researchers in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, we held a day-long event centered around asking a diverse group of researchers: what does it mean for Dryad to remain researcher-led?

Focusing on research perspectives 

Kicking this off, we found it essential to hear from researchers themselves on how they use data, what their policies are, and their thoughts on how data re-use could be better suited to their use cases. Listening to researchers that are in different levels of their careers, we could see broad similarities but also meaningful variance in how even within the Ecology and Environmental Biology fields there are very different needs and uses for similar research data. 

We explored these dynamics through a series of presentations.  Ashley Asmus, a graduate student involved in the DroughtNet and NutNet projects explained the large amount of data they depend on across 27 countries, which could benefit from a more mature data management infrastructure. Dr. Lizzie Wolkovich introduced her lab’s new data management policy, requiring open sharing of data. And Dr. Karthik Ram, explained his perspective on what the data world could learn from the software world in terms of making things as easy as possible, with a bottom-up approach.

Image from iOS copy 2

Dr. Karthik Ram presenting on his experience working with open source software

Dryad and the disciplinary repository landscape

Before diving into Dryad-specific discussions, we took time to have a large-format discussion with guests from BCO-DMO, a repository for Oceanographic data as well as folks from Arctic Data Center, both National Science Foundation funded discipline specific repositories. It was evident that researchers do not feel they have proper guidance on which repository to use, even when funders feel this piece is clearly stated. Beyond it being a mandate, it’s important for researchers to submit to these repositories as discipline specific repositories typically provide richer curation than multi-disciplinary “general” repositories. A heavy theme that emerged was how Dryad and others that are embedded in the article publishing processes could ensure submitted data are going to the right home.

Meeting user needs

Splitting the room based on user interests in submitting and publishing data or re-using data in Dryad, we turned the event space walls into post-it note exhibits. Researchers wrote down as many features and use cases they could think of for either submitting data or using data. Within their groups they then clustered and prioritized these features. Interestingly, the majority of participants chose to focus on data re-use, reflecting the change in open data acceptance amongst the community they represent. Some of the highest priority features in this arena were about integrations and development of software tools that make the curated data more usable. For those focusing on submission the top rated features were around crediting back to funders and institutions, as well as relations to the scripts and code used to analyze the data.

Image from iOS copy 3

Dr. Sally Otto representing the “Publishing Data” group discussion

Image from iOS copy 4

Researchers clustering and prioritizing data re-use features

Maintaining a researcher-led community and platform

Circling back to the opening question we prompted the group to think about their perceptions of what it means for researchers to be leading the Dryad community. Many of these perspectives centered around transparency in marketing, true costs, and the added values. A big note was on how we can overcome barriers like those who do not have funding to publish data. Researchers raised the point that they may not be able to cover the cost of a data publishing charge, even at a respected US-based institution. Questions of how curation, integration, and open-source values can be inclusive of these communities struggling for funding prompted us to consider how disparate and diverse scientific research may be, even within the same domain. We received innovative ideas related to business models for supporting a broader audience of researchers as well as outreach ideas reflecting the need to integrate deeper within the open-source software community.

Working in conjunction with the open repositories (BCO-DMO, Arctic Data Center) and repository networks (DataONE) present at the workshop, and continuing to be led in the forms of governance and product management by researchers, Dryad and California Digital Library are striving to both understand and promote proper practices for community-ownership in open source data publishing. While this was a one-day event, we aim to continue to engage with broader research communities and encourage any researcher to get in touch with us if you have feedback or ideas for how you can get involved in our community.

CDL and Dryad thank the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) for giving us the space to hold this meeting as well as the National Science Foundation for granting meeting funds.

Building on our Successes: Past and Present

photo-1513836279014-a89f7a76ae86

With the release of our new platform, we wanted to reflect on past successes and share our plans for the future. In this post we highlight how we have built upon Dryad’s historical strength and success to create an even better data service, and how we have expanded our mission and business model to broaden access and usage, and deepen community engagement.

Same mission, new team

In May of 2018, Dryad and the California Digital Library (CDL) partnered to accelerate research data publishing. The partnership has focused on the assessment and revamp of Dryad’s policies and infrastructure, ensuring that Dryad’s service is aligned with the data publishing infrastructure and support needs of the scholarly research community. Dryad’s primary mission continues to be to provide a platform for research data to be curated, published, and shared openly across research communities. 

It has been a very productive year for Dryad. In partnership with CDL, we have upgraded many of our day-to-day operations. For example, our product development team now includes staff from both CDL and Dryad working together on new features and integrations, and rebuilding the architecture underlying our service. However, the partnership does not change the overall mission of Dryad or the way the organization is governed. We remain an independent 501(c)3 governed by a 12-person board, with directors elected by members and representing diverse stakeholders, including representatives from research, data infrastructure, journal publishing, libraries, and research organizations.  

Same vision, new leadership

This month, the Dryad Board of Directors welcomes Caroline Sutton as our new Board Chair. As she takes on this role, we are grateful to our outgoing Board Chair, Chuck Fox. In addition, we thank one of our co-founders, Todd Vision, who is stepping down from the Board of Directors this year after 12 years of service. Throughout his time with Dryad, Todd’s discernment and leadership has been a lodestar for the organization. It has proven essential to Dryad’s growth and its commitment to the mission of promoting data sharing. Todd carries with him the living history of Dryad, and while we know he will continue to support Dryad in many ways, we will miss his input at Board meetings.

In addition to changes at the Board level, we thank Melissanne Scheld who is leaving Dryad this month. Melissanne has served at the Dryad helm during an exciting period of time and, on behalf of the entire Dryad community, we wish Melissanne all the best in her future endeavors. The Board has kicked off the search for a new Executive Director. Please see our job posting for more details. Our new Executive Director will be joining an organization that is in the midst of rapid product development and focused on continuing to build partnerships in the communities we serve. He or she will have the opportunity to work with an outstanding team who demonstrate loyalty and dedication to the Dryad mission and vision, in addition to working closely with our highly professional and driven colleagues at California Digital Library.

Same community, new members

The founding of Dryad was driven by researchers and journal editors who shared a goal of making the sharing of data common practice and a routine part of the scientific publication process. With funding from the US National Science Foundation, and support from journals, scholarly societies, and researchers, the “DRIADE” project (soon to become Dryad) was launched. Originally hosted at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center in North Carolina, the Dryad team is now widely geographically distributed and independent of any host organization. But we remain just as dedicated to serving the needs of the researchers that use Dryad, and the journals, societies and institutions that partner with us, to make research data as widely available as possible. With a 5 person in-house curation team that checks each dataset against FAIR principles, Dryad also prioritizes data quality, to make data not only sharable and discoverable, but also usable, maximizing the impact of every dataset shared via our service. 

To ensure our continued sustainability, we have worked this past year to expand the types of organizations that are members of the Dryad community. In March, we announced our revised institutional member model, which expanded membership from traditional journals and a couple of founding institutions, to the universities and other institutions that generate research data. We are proud to already have Yale University, California State University-East Bay, Montana State University, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology plus, through the CDL partnership, the ten University of California campuses, on board. In addition, we continue to support researchers by integrating our platform into publisher workflows and expanding publisher relationships. Dryad has been lucky to have support from the publishing community over the last decade, and looks forward to launching a revised publisher membership model to continue to build on these successes.

Same Dryad service, new types of data

Since our founding Dryad has focused on publishing datasets associated with published journal articles. This has led us to successfully publish over 29,000 globally accessible datasets, making the data supporting those publications freely available to anyone worldwide. But not all data collected by researchers leads to peer reviewed publications, and many datasets get broken up across publications (to meet journal requirements) and should be published as a cohesive unit. Other datasets may be associated with non-traditional sorts of publications, such as data associated with preprints and software packages, or PhD dissertations and Masters theses. Such datasets need a curated home from which they can be shared and cited as valued research outputs. 

As we announced earlier this week, we have built the capacity to support data deposits that are not associated with the traditional peer-reviewed journal paper in our new platform. We will ensure this new expanded scope of Dryad will include the same curation and access that the Dryad community values, and that associated metadata will allow not only for data discoverability but also ensure that data are understood and can be reused by the community. 

Dryad’s mission is, and always has been, to serve the needs of the scholarly research community. As we reflect on our past, and optimistically look to our future, we see continued growth of our service and remain eager to hear your thoughts. Check out our new platform, follow us on Twitter, and get in touch.

 

New Dryad is Here

The Dryad team has worked over the past year to understand what features are required to best support the research community’s ever-evolving needs. We are proud to announce the launch of our new Dryad platform and we are excited to share with the research community the enhancements that we have made!  

Dryad’s newest features are centered around making data publishing as easy as possible for researchers:

  • In addition to supporting datasets as part of a journal submission, Dryad now also supports datasets being submitted independently
  • Data can be uploaded from cloud storage or lab servers 
  • Datasets can be as large as 300GB
  • Datasets can easily be updated or versioned at any time in our process
  • Standardized data usage and citation statistics are updated and displayed for each published dataset 
  • Data can be submitted and downloaded through our new REST APIs

Since our beginning, Dryad has curated, published, and archived nearly 30,000 datasets underlying scholarly articles. While Dryad began and flourished in the ecology and evolutionary biology communities, it now encompasses the life and biomedical sciences and is gaining larger traction in the broader science and publishing landscapes.  As Dryad expands its disciplinary scope, we are taking into consideration the evolution of data management and publication practices throughout the sciences. 

New features to support current research practices

Because of these changing needs, we believe it is essential to allow for datasets to be submitted and published at any point in the research process. We see the need for datasets to be submitted or published at the point of preprints, micropublications, project completion, null result findings, or in preparation for submitting a manuscript (to name a few). 

Image from Gyazo

We also understand that data and research are dynamic, so it is important to support versioning and enhanced descriptor fields for these datasets through the research process. As part of the new Dryad, we have increased fields for usage notes, methods, standard vocabularies (i.e., funder), as well as increased file size limits all to enable consistent updating and improvements.

Image from Gyazo

We believe these changes can allow researchers to make their datasets as usable and understandable (FAIR) as possible, treating each dataset as a citable and valued research output. 

“We aim to build in best practices for research data so researchers don’t have to think about compliance and making their data discoverable.”

-Daniella Lowenberg, Dryad Product Manager

 

The road ahead

Dryad has long been embedded in the scientific communities through support by and for the outputs of funding bodies (i.e., National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, European Commission, private funding agencies, etc) and journal publishers and societies (i.e. The Royal Society, British Ecological Society, American Academy for the Advancement of Science). Going forward, Dryad aims to further build these connections through institutional memberships. We welcome our newest institutional members, and look forward to growing our membership, to support the costs and data publishing needs of their researchers. 

“The features and new capabilities encompassed in our new platform reflect Dryad’s long standing commitment to working with the data sharing community to build a premier data repository service that reflects the evolving needs of researchers, their funders and institutions. I look forward to welcoming new members to this growing global community.”

– Caroline Sutton, Dryad Board Chair

 

The new Dryad platform is just the beginning for our roadmap to make data publishing both robust and seamless. We have already started building integrations with publishing platforms such as Editorial Manager, ScholarOne, and PubSweet that will enable more journals to integrate with Dryad at the point of article submission. 

We will also be working with data analysis and computing spaces like Jupyter, Binder, WholeTale, and rOpenSci to allow for published datasets to be usable within researcher workspaces. To further ensure discoverability of datasets, we are also working with PubMed to allow for Dryad datasets related to articles to be searchable. As we announced earlier this year, we will be building on our partnership with Zenodo that makes software and data publishing a more connected and easy process for both researchers and publishers. 

Get involved

The road ahead is exciting and will take us closer to our goal of supporting researchers and making data publishing easier. We invite you to provide user feedback and potential integration discussions. 

Check out our Github, follow us on Twitter, and get in touch.

 

Funded Partnership Brings Dryad and Zenodo Closer

By Daniella Lowenberg (Cross posted at Zenodo)

With increasing mandates and initiatives around open data and software, researchers commonly have to make a choice about where to deposit their non-article outputs. Unfortunately, systems that are built to accommodate these objects work separately and can make the process more difficult. As a result, data, code, figures, and other outputs go to a variety of disconnected places, or improper homes (i.e. code with the wrong license or data not curated). To tackle this issue, and make open research best practices more seamless for researchers, we are thrilled to announce a partnership between Dryad and Zenodo.

Dryad is a leader in data curation and data publishing. For the last ten years, Dryad has focused primarily on research data, supporting a CC0 license and manually curating each incoming dataset. Zenodo, a general use repository hosted at CERN, has been paving the way in software citation and publishing. As long time players in the open science movement, we believe that we can advance open science and open-source projects further by working together.  Instead of working individually to broaden each our scopes, building competitive features, and inefficiently using our limited resources, Dryad and Zenodo will be working together to support more seamless workflows that make the process easier for researchers. 

To jumpstart this collaboration, we are proud to have been awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation grant that will enable us to co-develop new solutions focused on supporting researcher and publisher workflows as well as best practices in data and software curation. By focusing on integrations between our systems, leveraging data and software expertise, we can both extend the reach of our services and open up more opportunities for broader research communities.  We are looking forward to re-imagining the submission process for researchers and how we can better support our journal publishing and institutional communities along the way.

Our leadership teams are dedicated to the future of our co-development projects. “Dryad has long admired the work Zenodo does in our shared space and we are thrilled to finally find a way to collaborate on a project that benefits researchers around the globe. The Dryad-Zenodo integration is an excellent example of how two like-minded organizations can join together in a shared vision,” says Melissanne Scheld, Executive Director at Dryad. 

Dryad and Zenodo have always shared the same Open Science values, this is why we are very excited to partner up with such a talented team and bring the future of scientific publication one step closer to reality. We look forward to this inspiring collaboration with Dryad as well as helping the research community to move science forward.” says Jose Benito Gonzalez, Head of Digital Repositories at CERN/Zenodo.

As we embark on this open-source project and partnership together, we invite community feedback and input.  

New additions to the Dryad community

The Dryad community is expanding and diversifying! We’re excited to announce both the addition of a new institutional member and the results of our recent Board of Directors election.

New international institutional member

KAUST (The King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) has officially joined Dryad, thus furthering their aspirations to “be a destination for scientific and technological education and research.”KAUST logoWe hope KAUST will be the first of many global research institutions to join under our newly-launched institutional membership model.

To find out more and join yourself, go to datadryad.org/join.

Newly-elected Board members

Dryad Board of Directors elections are held annually, in conjunction with our member meeting. BOD members are elected or re-elected each year by the membership to serve 3-year terms. Our 12-member Board is meant to represent the various stakeholders in the Dryad community — publishers, researchers, technologists, funders, libraries and others.

Two of our current BOD members were eligible to run for a second term, and were re-elected to the Class of 2022. We’re thrilled to have Jennifer Lin and Johan Nilsson continue in their roles.

Meanwhile, please join us in welcoming two brand-new members to the Board:

Catriona MacCallum

Catriona MacCallum

Catriona MacCallum is Director of Open Science at Hindawi Ltd, London, UK. She has almost 20 years experience in scholarly publishing and 15 years in Open Access Publishing. She initially worked as Editor of Trends in Ecology & Evolution for Elsevier before joining the Open-Access publisher PLOS in 2003 to launch PLOS Biology as one of the Senior Editors. She also acted as a Consulting Editor on PLOS ONE, leaving PLOS as Advocacy Director in 2017. She is currently a member of the European Commission’s Open Science Policy Platform and the UKRI Open Access Practitioners Group.  She also serves on the Royal Society Board (Publishing), and is on the newly launched steering committee of DORA. She is a founding individual of I4OC (the Initiative for Open Citations) campaign. She has a PhD (on speciation) from the University of Edinburgh.

Naomi Penfold

Naomi Penfold. Photo credit: Orquidea Real Photobook – Julieta Sarmiento Photography

As Associate Director of ASAPbio, a non-profit organization promoting transparency and innovation in life sciences communication, Naomi Penfold is leading activities to engage the research community to promote the productive use of preprints in biology. She navigates the relationships between publishers, funders, researchers and consumers of science in order to drive innovation in the communication of life sciences research. Naomi is a CEFP2019 fellow with the AAAS’s Community Engagement Fellowship Programme, run by Lou Woodley and colleagues at the Center for Scientific Collaboration and Community Engagement. She learns and contributes to open science advocacy and innovation as an OpenCon alumnus, Mozilla Science community contributor and through advisory and organising roles with multiple open science projects (OpenAsInBook club; PREreview) and events (ResearchObject 2018 workshop; Open Access week 2018; OpenCon 2017). Prior to joining ASAPbio, Naomi worked as Innovation Officer (2016-2018) and Events Coordinator (2016) with eLife, and was a Wellcome Trust science policy intern with the Academy of Medical Sciences in the UK. Naomi graduated with a PhD in Clinical Biochemistry from the University of Cambridge in 2017.
Further information: https://asapbio.org/dt_team/naomi-penfold

Catriona and Naomi will assume their duties starting at the next BOD meeting in August.

—-

Lastly, a note of enormous gratitude to outgoing BOD member Alf Eaton, and also to Charles Fox, a long-serving Dryad Director and our outgoing Chair. We couldn’t have done it without you!

A New Day for Dryad

dryadlogo_treeThere so much is new activity at Dryad! As we prepare to relaunch our platform later this summer, we’ve been hard at work on:

  1. Rolling out a new Institutional Membership plan with enhanced benefits
  2. Planning for an upcoming webinar
  3. Redesigning our logo!

A New Way to Partner with us: Institutional Memberships

Over the past few months you may have heard of or been involved in conversations about Dryad launching a new Institutional Membership – the ‘rumors’ are true and we are pleased to be rolling out this new program to institutions globally! During our first week, California State University – East Bay and Montana State University have officially joined the Dryad community! We are very excited to have these two institutions as members. And they’re excited to join as well:

“Dryad provides Cal State East Bay faculty and students with a tool that will not only preserve their research data but also make it available to the public at large. Because equity and access are core values of our university, we are excited to be one of the early adopters.”

— Jeffra Diane Bussmann, MLIS Associate Librarian

Screen Shot 2019-03-20 at 4.53.43 PM

Our plan is to build a member-owned community of organizations who support data publishing, curation, and preservation on behalf of researchers. We need to band together to make this happen. We know that researchers depend on Dryad; even as more institutions build and promote local data repositories, the number of submissions to Dryad continues to grow year on year. Our goal is to make the Dryad community compatible with the efforts of all institutions, regardless of local data repository infrastructure.

(Our new Institutional Membership is the first step in this direction; towards the end of the year we will be launching a new Publisher Membership with enhanced integrations and customized reporting, but more on that in a few months).

For now, we are rolling out the Institutional Membership program.  We encourage all research institutions to join now as we prepare to re-launch the Dryad platform. The ‘new’ Dryad will offer features for institutional members including campus single sign-on, bespoke reporting, local curation capabilities, and campus co-branding.

Our new model allows for flexibility in how we partner with research organizations.Through our curation, reporting, and integration systems, Dryad can either serve as your primary repository or supplement the services you currently offer.

Forthcoming Webinar

If you’d like to hear more about how your institution can be part of the Dryad community, please join our Institutional Member Webinar on March 27th!

At this webinar Dryad will be joined by our colleagues John Chodacki and Daniella Lowenberg from the California Digital Library (CDL) to discuss the MANY reasons to join the Dryad community as we showcase some of the new functionality and outline the benefits a Membership brings your institution.

Of course, one of the key questions everyone will want to know is – what will this cost? Dryad has crafted a tiered pricing structure based on an institution’s ability to pay. We don’t want any potential member to not be able to join because of the annual fee, so hopefully our plans will work for any potential institution (and if not, I would be happy to discuss directly with you).

Our New Look

As a capstone to these major changes, you may have noticed we have refreshed the Dryad logo! We think this new bright image conveys the spirit of connectivity that Dryad represents across our community. It also retains a thematic connection to our original design. After all, Dryad is still true to our roots (no logo-based pun intended); it is important to us that we never lose sight of Dryad’s core mission to support infrastructure that openly and freely shares and preserves research data for the long term.

If you’d like to JOIN TODAY or receive additional information regarding Dryad, please contact me at director@datadryad.org.

See you at the Institutional Member Webinar on March 27th.