The way forward at Dryad

Crossroads

Melissanne Scheld, Executive Director, takes time to reflect on the Dryad/CDL partnership and to share thoughts on the direction of this collaborative effort.

It’s been a fast two months since I joined Dryad at this pivotal and exciting juncture. As previously announced, this spring Dryad entered into a formal partnership with California Digital Library (CDL) to ensure long-term sustainability for Dryad and to reinforce two essential,  shared goals:

  1. Create sustainability for open-source, community-owned, data curation & publication infrastructure
  2. Drive adoption of curated data publishing in the research community.

Where we are

For the past decade, Dryad has served as a highly regarded, non-profit, curated repository for data research across disciplines. None of that is changing!

Going forward we need to better meet researchers within their own workflows. We need to make the action of submitting research data even easier so that it becomes a seamless step within the publishing process.

We are currently working to migrate the Dryad system onto CDL’s Dash platform. Using an Agile framework, developers from both Dryad and CDL are collaborating to build an open-source, nimble service that will offer a higher level of administrative functionality, an improved curation layer, and various submission options.

Where we’re going

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Researchers will find our new offering continues to meet funder requirements and sets the bar in best practices for data sharing. Using the FAIR data principles as a guide, the curation we perform on each dataset deposited eases findability and usability, while the new levels of enhanced integrations we plan to develop (more on this below) will further improve submitters’ workflows.

For institutions, we want to offer an infrastructure that supports local research data management through features including campus single sign-on, bespoke reporting, integration with local repositories, and campus co-branding. The global network of libraries, which CDL is part of, will help us reach a wider range institutions that are also looking for data management solutions.

Dryad has always had strong publisher support; our new offering will improve these partnerships through enhanced API integrations. Going forward we will build upon our publishing partners while also working with platform providers to develop direct integrations. This will provide a more automated submission process around the transmission of metadata and DOIs.

We want to build modular infrastructure that is future-proof. We should be thinking about data publishing both as its own entity and in conjunction with article publishing. There are many avenues for circulating research and data publishing should be a part of all of these. Publishing data should be as ‘easy’ and ‘standardized‘ as article publishing.

Along with more robust infrastructure, we need to rethink how we build Dryad’s sustainability.  As a small, lean, non-profit, we need to build financial models that don’t overburden any single segment of our community, but still allow us to support the high level of curation and preservation infrastructure for which Dryad is known.

We are currently market testing new models within our community and have been talking with institutions and publishers to hear how we can best support their data publishing needs and what shared costs might look like. We know that there has been a lot of talk lately in our wider community about membership models; early feedback from our partners indicates this is still the most favorable method for investing in long-term sustainability.

What will success look like for us?  

successThe Dryad/CDL partnership aims to create a self-sustaining, curated, digital data repository for researchers across all fields of inquiry, based on the needs of and supported by institutional and publisher community members. We are building from a strong foundation, have created a thoughtful roadmap through community feedback, and are confident we are on a pathway to sustainability.

Personally, I’m very excited about all of these changes and know that, in partnership with CDL, we will be able to better serve our community. I look forward to updating you on future developments, but in the meantime, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me at director@datadryad.org with any questions or comments.

Technical update — Schema.org and Google Dataset Search

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Image by Pete

A core part of Dryad’s mission is to make our data available as widely as possible. Although most users find Dryad content through our website or via links from journal articles, many users also find Dryad content through search aggregators and other third-party services. For our content to be available to these external services, we follow the FAIR principle of Interoperability and make metadata available through a number of machine-readable mechanisms, including OAI-PMH, the DataONE API, and RSS.

This year, we added support for a new machine-readable mechanism, the Schema.org metadata format. This format was originally developed by representatives of major search engines, including Google, Bing, and Yahoo. It has recently been endorsed by a number of data repositories, including Dryad. The Schema.org metadata format allows us to embed machine-readable descriptions of data directly into the same web pages that users use to view Dryad content.

For example, for this recently deposited data package, you can visit the web page to view information optimized for human users. But if you use your web browser’s option to “view source” on the page, you will find the following metadata embedded in the Schema.org format:

{
    "@context" : "http://schema.org/",
    "@type" : "Dataset",
    "@id" : "https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.70d46",
    "name" : "Data from: Biodiverse cities: the nursery industry, 
    homeowners, and neighborhood differences drive urban tree
    composition",
    "author" : [ {
        "@type" : "Person",
        "@id" : "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2649-9159",
        "givenName" : "Meghan",
        "familyName" : "Avolio"
    }, {
        "@type" : "Person",
        "@id" : "http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7209-514X",
        "givenName" : "Diane",
        "familyName" : "Pataki"
    }, {
        "@type" : "Person",
        "@id" : "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5215-4947",
        "givenName" : "Tara",
        "familyName" : "Trammell"
    }, {
        "@type" : "Person",
        "givenName" : "Joanna",
        "familyName" : "Endter-Wada"
    } ],
    "datePublished" : "2017-12-18",
    "description" : "In arid and semi-arid regions, where few if any 
    trees are native, city trees are largely human-planted. Societal 
    factors such as resident preferences for tree traits, nursery 
    offerings, and neighborhood characteristics are potentially key 
    drivers of urban tree community composition and diversity....",
    "keywords" : [ "urban tree diversity" ],
    "citation" : {
        "@type" : "Article",
        "identifier" : "doi:10.1002/ecm.1290"},
    "publisher" : {
        "@type" : "Organization",
        "name" : "Dryad Digital Repository",
        "url" : "https://datadryad.org"}
}

The Schema.org metadata is available for any search engines or other interested users to collect and use. Last week, we saw the first major use of this metadata, with the launch of the Google Dataset Search service. Although Google Dataset Search is still in beta, the initial version is promising. It is easy to search and find content from Dryad and other data repositories all within a single system.

We are proud to make Dryad content available through the Dataset Search, and we look forward to other organizations making use of our data in new and exciting ways!

Dryad welcomes Scheld as new Executive Director

Dryad is excited to announce the appointment of Melissanne Scheld as Executive Director.

Melissanne joins as Dryad embarks upon our 10th year of providing open, not-for-profit infrastructure for scholarly data, and as we begin a strategic partnership with California Digital Library (CDL) to address researcher needs by leading an open, community-supported initiative in research data curation and publishing.

We are pleased Melissanne is joining us at this auspicious point in Dryad’s trajectory. With over 25 years of experience working with the academic community, and with her knowledge of the scholarly communications industry, we are confident she will successfully lead Dryad into our second decade as a community-supported provider of open data services.

–Charles Fox, Dryad Board of Directors Chairperson and Professor, University of Kentucky

Melissanne most recently served as Managing Director of Publishers Communication Group, a scholarly publishing consultancy, and has previously held positions at the university presses of Cambridge, New York University, and Columbia.

To welcome our new ED and/or inquire about ways to get involved with Dryad, send an email to director@datadryad.org.

Introducing the Dryad BOD Class of 2021

We are thrilled to announce the latest additions to the Dryad Board of Directors.

Our 12-member Board is intended to be a diverse group, with a mix of background and skills useful to represent the various stakeholders in the Dryad community — publishers, researchers, technologists, funders, and libraries. BOD members are elected or re-elected each year by the membership to serve 3-year terms.

New members for 2018-2021

The following individuals have assumed their duties:

horstmannWolfram Horstmann has been Director of Göttingen State and University Library since 2014. Prior to that, he was Associate Director at the Bodleian Libraries of the University of Oxford, UK and CIO at Bielefeld University, Germany. He is Professor at the Information School of the Humboldt University in Berlin, teaching Electronic Publishing, Open Access and Open Science. He is biologist by training and worked on the epistemology of simulations for his doctoral thesis. Read more about Wolfram.

mangiaficoPaolo Mangiafico is the Scholarly Communications Strategist at Duke University and Director of the Scholarly Communication Institute. In his role at Duke, Paolo works with librarians, technologists, faculty, students and university leadership to plan and implement programs that promote greater reach and impact for scholarship in many forms, including open access to publications and data and emerging platforms for publishing digital scholarship.

suttonCaroline Sutton is Director of Editorial Development with Taylor & Francis. Before joining the company in October 2016, she was co-founder of Co-Action Publishing, a full OA publisher. She helped to found and served as the first President of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA) and is a member of the present board.  At Taylor & Francis, Caroline has led efforts to roll out data sharing policies as well as initiatives related to open scholarship across subject areas.

uhlirPaul Uhlir, J.D. is a consultant in information policy and management. He was Scholar at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC in 2015-2016, and Director of its Board on Research Data and Information, 2008-2015. He was employed at the NAS in various capacities from 1985-2016. Paul has won several prizes from the NAS and the international CODATA in data policy, and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Read more detailed information about his professional activities.

Officers for 2018-2019

Shout-out to our new slate of Board officers:

  • Charles Fox (Chair)
  • Johan Nilsson (Vice-chair)
  • Brian Hole (continuing as Treasurer)
  • Fiona Murphy (Secretary)

Ex Officio members

Filling out the Board roster are two members in Ex Officio (non-voting) status. We are thankful that Todd Vision, longtime BOD member and PI of grants supporting Dryad, will continue to serve. We also welcome Günter Waibel, Associate Vice Provost and Executive Director of California Digital Library, in this capacity to represent our recently-announced partnership with the CDL.

Finally, we wish to express our sincere appreciation to outgoing BOD members and officers for their work on behalf of Dryad and open data.

Open data tips from the Dryad curation team | Part 2: Endangered species

This is the second in a series of blog posts highlighting new guidance from the Dryad curation team. Part 1 covered human subjects data. Part 2, from curator Shavon Stewart, focuses on best practices for sharing data associated with endangered species.


Ensuring safe data sharing for species under threat

Tasmanian devils, mountain gorillas, and black rhinos all have one thing in common. They are listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List of threatened species. Data archived in Dryad are publicly available, therefore, potential risks to endangered and vulnerable species must be carefully assessed before submitting data.

It is imperative that threatened species remain safe in their natural habitat. Publishing location data and habitat descriptions can expose species to hunters, poachers, and wildlife enthusiasts which can lead to their further decline, as well as hinder conservation efforts. The key is to provide fewer details of the species’ location for those with the intention of doing harm, without overly compromising analyses or replication by other researchers.

Here at Dryad, we recommend simple actions such as masking coordinates by a few decimal points or removing exact geo-coordinates from the dataset, which can limit illegal access to these vulnerable creatures.

Modified geo-coordinates for the breeding sites of Falco naumanni, from https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.jq87d

Researchers who work with vulnerable species are encouraged to consult the following resources prior to submitting data:

Dryad partnering with CDL to accelerate data publishing

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Image credit Cat Specialist Group, catsg.org

Dryad is thrilled to announce a strategic partnership with California Digital Library (CDL) to address researcher needs by leading an open, community-supported initiative in research data curation and publishing.

Dryad was founded 10 years ago with the mission of providing open, not-for-profit infrastructure for data underlying the scholarly literature, and the vision of promoting a world where research data is openly available and routinely re-used to create knowledge.

20,000 data publications later, that message has clearly resonated. The Dryad model of embedding data publication within journal workflows has proven highly effective, and combined with our data curation expertise, has made Dryad a name that is both known and trusted in the research community. But a lot has changed in the data publishing space since 2008, and Dryad needs to change with it.

Who/what is CDL?

CDL LoroCDL was founded by the University of California in 1997 to take advantage of emerging technologies that were transforming the way digital information was being published and accessed. Since then, in collaboration with the UC libraries and other partners, they have assembled one of the world’s leading digital research libraries and changed the ways that faculty, students, and researchers discover and access information.

CDL has long-standing interest and experience in research data management (RDM) and data publishing. CDL’s digital curation program, the University of California Curation Center (UC3), provides digital preservation, data curation, and data publishing services, and has a history of coordinating collaborative projects regionally, nationally, and internationally. It is baked into CDL’s strategic vision to build partnerships to better promote and make an impact in the library, open research, and data management spaces (e.g., DMPTool, HathiTrust).

Why a partnership?

CDL and Dryad have a shared mission of increasing the adoption and availability of open data. By joining forces, we can have a much bigger impact. This partnership is focused on combining CDL’s institutional relationships, expertise, and nimble technology with Dryad’s position in the researcher community, curation workflows, and publisher relationships. By working together, we plan to create global efficiencies and minimize needless duplication of effort across institutions, freeing up time and funds, and, in particular, allowing institutions with fewer resources to support research data publishing and ensure data remain open.

Our joint Dryad-CDL initiative will increase adoption of open data by meeting researchers where they already are. We will leverage the strengths of both organizations to offer new products and services and to build broad, sustainable, and productive approaches to data curation. We plan to move quickly to provide new value:

  • For researchers: We will launch a new, modern and easier-to-use platform. This will provide a higher level of service, and even more seamless integration into regular workflows than Dryad currently offers
  • For journals and publishers: We will offer new integration paths that will allow direct communication with manuscript processing systems, better reporting, and more comprehensive curation services
  • For academic institutions: We will work directly with institutions to craft right-sized offerings to meet your needs

We have many details to hammer out and a lot of work to do, but among our first steps will be to reach out to you — each of the groups above — to discuss your needs, wants, and preferred methods of supporting this effort. With your help, the partnership will help us grow Dryad as a globally-accessible, community-led, non-commercial, low-cost service that focus on breaking down silos between publishing, libraries, and research.

As this partnership is taking shape, we ask for community input on how our collective efforts can best meet the needs of researchers, publishers, and institutions. Please stay tuned for further announcements and information over the coming months. We hope you share our excitement as we step into Dryad’s next chapter.

Dryad and the GDPR

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a major piece of data privacy legislation coming into effect on May 25, 2018. GDPR will apply to all companies processing the personal data of all European Union residents, regardless of the company’s location.

We’d like to take this opportunity to emphasize that Dryad respects the privacy of our users and submitters and works to protect all personally identifiable information we collect, which is limited to names and contact information. We have an existing privacy policy to which submitters agree when they create a Dryad profile, and again when they submit data. Some steps we will be taking:

  • Reviewing our privacy policy to ensure it conforms to GDPR requirements;
  • Reviewing the parts of our system where submitters provide and maintain personal data, ensuring that there are links to the privacy policy, and that actions to control one’s personal data are clear; and
  • Reviewing the methods we use to communicate with submitters, users, and others to ensure that you do not receive unwanted emails.

If you are concerned about the accuracy of personally identifiable information maintained by Dryad, wish to review, access, or correct this information, or would like your information removed from Dryad’s records, you may contact us anytime at help@datadryad.org.