New pricing structure with simplified terms and increased size limits

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Over the last few years, we’ve learned a lot about what is needed to curate, preserve, and provide access to data for the long term, as well as to sustain an independent not-for-profit organization. We’ve also paid close attention to the needs and wants of our user community and members. To meet these needs, we are revising our pricing structure for the first time since it was introduced in 2013.

  • Submissions initiated after 4 January 2016 will have a base Data Publication Charge (DPC) of $120US.
  • Pricing is now the same for all journals – there will no longer be an additional surcharge for non-integrated publications.
  • We encourage individuals and small groups to purchase bundles of DPC vouchers in advance and in any quantity. Purchases over 25 DPCs will enjoy a discount.
  • As a further user benefit, we will be doubling the maximum package size before overage fees kick in (to 20GB) and simplifying and reducing the overage fees.
  • We will continue to waive DPCs for researchers from World Bank low-income and low-middle-income economies upon request.
  • Membership fees are not changing, but Dryad members will be entitled to receive larger discounts on DPCs.
  • As always, there are no fees to download or reuse data from Dryad.
  • Integrating Dryad’s system with partner journals remains a free service.

Dryad’s Board of Directors will continue to keep a close eye on the repository’s sustainability progress. We anticipate this price structure will remain stable for the foreseeable future and are always seeking opportunities for savings and efficiencies.

We are grateful to our community supporters and take seriously the responsibility to ensure the long-term availability of the research data entrusted to us.

Prepaid data submission vouchers can be purchased at current pricing levels ($80 apiece) through January 4th (and at the new price of $120 apiece after that), by contacting help@datadryad.org.

Payment plans are either subscription or usage-based. Organizations and individuals may also make advance purchases of any number of DPCs and are eligible for bulk discounts for purchases of 25 or more.

What exactly do your DPCs cover?

The following breakdown of expenses reflects projected costs in the near future, extrapolating from historic growth rates. Approximately half of costs are associated with Repository Management, including membership-based nonprofit governance, communications with Dryad’s many stakeholders, members and partners, and upkeep of software systems (Repository Maintenance). Another quarter of the costs are due to the curation and user support provided to each data package, part of Dryad’s unique service offering and commitment to quality.

Since Dryad is a virtual organization, Infrastructure & Facilities largely covers server costs, digital storage, and interoperability technologies such as Digital Object identifiers (DOIs). A small fraction goes to community outreach activities to help encourage data publication best practices and raise awareness of Dryad. Administrative Support covers essential functions such as accounting and contract review.

Finally, Research and Development is essential for building new features to support changing technology and user expectations. R&D expenses are included here, but would ordinarily be covered through special project grants and not considered an operating expense paid for through DPCs.

We expect that as efficiencies are put into place, volume increases, and further economies of scale are realized, the percentage of the DPC supporting Repository Management will decrease and other areas, most notably Curation, will increase.

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New integrated journals from the University of Chicago Press – Journals Division

UCP logoDryad is very pleased to announce a new partnership with the University of Chicago Press – Journals Division. Founded in 1890, Chicago is one of the oldest and currently the largest continuously operating university press in the United States. Chicago has recently integrated two additional journals with Dryad: Physiological and Biochemical Zoology (PBZ) and International Journal of Plant Sciences (IJPS) and is sponsoring Data Publication Charges (DPCs) for both titles. PBZ and IJPS join sister publication, The American Naturalist, a Dryad partner since its inception.

Integration with Dryad

  • Ensures bidirectional links between the article and the data, and increased visibility for both
  • Simplifies the process of data submission for authors
  • Takes advantage of Dryad’s professional curators who perform basic checks to ensure discoverability and proper metadata
  • Ensures that the data is freely accessible once the article becomes available online

Physiological and Biochemical Zoology publishes original research in the areas of animal physiology and biochemistry. PBZ focuses on ecological, evolutionary and behavioral aspects of morphological, physiological, and biochemical mechanisms. PBZ’s integration will allow authors to make their data available to journal editors during peer review.

The International Journal of Plant Sciences has been publishing plant science research since 1875. IJPS covers a wide range of topics including genetics and genomics, developmental and cell biology, biochemistry and physiology, morphology and anatomy, systematics, evolution, paleobotany, ecology, and plant-microbe interactions. IJPS will accept data from authors at the time of article acceptance.

The University of Chicago Press – Journals Division is increasing its commitment to authors and the STM field by making it easy to publish datasets alongside the manuscript, and by taking the extra step of covering the cost of data publication on behalf of authors. To learn more about journal integration with Dryad and DPCs, contact us.

Three newly sponsored journals from The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery

We are delighted to announce the integration of three new journals: The Bone & Joint Journal, Bone & Joint Research and Bone & Joint360.

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The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery is a not-for-profit charity formed in 1953 for “the advancement and improvement of education in orthopaedic surgery and allied branches of surgery,” achieved through publication of The Bone & Joint Journal (formerly known as JBJS (Br)). With all three journals, authors should submit the data to Dryad after the manuscript has been accepted.

Please see here for more information about how your journal can integrate manuscript and data submission to Dryad.

 

What were the most downloaded data packages in 2014?

The reason why Dryad is in the business of archiving, preserving, and providing access to research data is so that it will be reused, whether for deeper reading of the publication, for post-publication review, for education, or for future research. While it’s not yet as easy as we would like to track data reuse, one metric that is straightforward to collect is the number of times a dataset has been downloaded, and this is one of two data reuse statistics reported by our friends at ImpactStory and Plum Analytics.

2014 with fireworks

The numbers are very encouraging. There are already over a quarter million downloads for the 8,897 data files released in 2014 (from 2,714 data packages). That’s over 28 downloads per data file. While there is always the caveat that some downloads may be due to activity from newly emerged bots that we have yet to recognize and filter out, we think it is safe to say that most of these downloads are from people.

To celebrate, we would like to pay special tribute to the top five data packages from 2014, as measured by the maximum number of downloads for any single file (since many data packages have more than one) at the time of writing. They cover a diversity of topics from livestock farming in the Paleolithic to phylogenetic relationships among insects. That said, we are struck by the impressively strong showing for plant science — 3 of the top 5 data packages.

In 5th place, with 453 downloads

In 4th place, with 581 downloads

In 3rd place, with 626 downloads

In 2nd place, with 4,672 downloads

And in 1st place, with a staggering 34,879 downloads

Remarkably, given the number of downloads, this last data package was only released in November.

We’d like to thank all of our users, whether you contribute data or reuse it (or both), for helping make science just a little more transparent, efficient, and robust this past year. And we are looking forward to finding out some more of what you did with all those downloads in 2015!