Dryad Executive Director to pursue new opportunities

Over the past 3 ½ years, Dryad has become an independent organization with a committed team and organizational capacity. During this time, integrations and partnerships have expanded and sustainability plans have grown. From these efforts, we increased the amount of curated and openly published data available to the public. With great pride and bittersweet feelings, I will be moving on to pursue a new opportunity on Feb 23.

Working with the staff has meant collaborating with a group of committed, mission-driven professionals. Leading this group to become a collegial and very high-functioning team has been my absolute pleasure. I have also been honored to be accepted as an equal in the field of open data advocates and crafters of scholarly communication workflows, and to be able to share my vision of Dryad as a critical service. The support, encouragement, and concern of the Dryad board of directors was always behind me, and I’ve been energized at what we’ve accomplished in support of curated, open, and FAIR data.

A search for a new Executive Director has begun. This person will have the opportunity to develop mission-critical business strategies and to offer an innovative vision for promoting data openness in the scientific community and securing Dryad’s place as a key facilitator of data sharing. With the Dryad board’s support, Elizabeth Hull, Dryad Operations Manager, is filling in during the interim.

I want to thank our incredibly supportive community of submitters, members, partners, and collaborators for their dedication to open data and to Dryad’s mission. This next phase for the organization is now beginning. We invite you to join us and grow Dryad!

 

Exciting new partnership for long-term preservation of Dryad data

Keeping research data open and accessible has always been our goal at Dryad. Now, we’ve partnered with Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS) to ensure long-term preservation of curated data. We are proud to be taking this step to safeguard open data and ensure future discoverability.

Public content on Dryad servers, currently over 15,000 data packages and 50,000 files, will soon be backed up in the DANS archive regularly (with multiple copies in different locations), to add an extra layer of protection.

DANS will also serve as Dryad’s successor archive, to ensure that functionality of Dryad Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) is maintained for the long term. Metadata will be available in open access format to all researchers using the DANS online archiving system, EASY.

This partnership ensures that data in Dryad will remain accessible and linked to the scholarly literature in the unlikely case of disruption of Dryad services. DANS has proven to be a natural fit for us in this effort. Dryad and DANS share a deep commitment to the stewardship of global scientific data on behalf of more than 50,000 researchers who trust us with their data and hundreds of publishing partners working with Dryad.

Henk Harmsen, Deputy director of DANS, says:

Together with Dryad we are committed to making digital research data and related outputs Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR). This collaboration minimizes the risk of loss or corruption of data over time. We are pleased to extend our capacity and data archive by partnering with Dryad.

A month of open

We’re coming off of a big month which included a two-day Dryad board meeting, International Data Week in Denver, and the Open Access Publishers meeting (COASP) in Arlington, VA. Combined with Open Access Week, we’ve been basking in all things #openscience at Dryad.

International Data Week 2016

International Data Week was a collection of three different events: SciDataCon 2016International Data Forum, idwlogoand the 8th Research Data Alliance Plenary Meeting. While it was my first time attending RDA and SciDataCon, it wasn’t the first time for the many Dryad board members who have been actively participating in these forums for years.

Dryad staff had the pleasure of participating in a few panels over the week. As part of SciDataCon, Elizabeth Hull discussed protecting human subjects in an open data repository. In another, as part of the RDA 8th Plenary, I participated in a discussion of the challenges surrounding sustainability of data infrastructure. (The talk is available on the RDA website. The panel starts at minute 30).

29822088326_6d9db25bbf_qParticipating in IDW reminded me how important our diverse community of stakeholders and members are to furthering the adoption of open data. Dryad members create a community and support our mission. Our members benefit by receiving discounts on data publication fees and by relying on a repository that stays current in the evolving needs and mandates that surround open data. We work together to help make open data easy and affordable for authors.

Asking OA publishers to be more open

Following International Data Week, I had the opportunity to participate for the first time in the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association meeting, COASP 2016. Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC kicked off the meeting with a keynote that urged attendees to consider how they would complete the phrase “Open in order to . . .” as a way to ensure that we all keep our sights on working toward something more than just ‘open for the sake of open’. Some of other memorable talks addressed the challenges with mapping connections from articles to other related outputs, and discussed the growing interest in alternative revenue models to article processing charges (APCs). I had the privilege to deliver a keynote entitled “Be More Open” which highlighted the connections between Open Access and Open Data movement, and I encouraged OASPA to add open data policies to their membership requirements.

I’d like to thank the organizers and sponsors of International Data Week and COASP 2016 for making these important conversations possible. In addition, I would also like to encourage any interested stakeholders to join Dryad and support open data.

Introducing Dryad’s new board members

One of the most rewarding things about working for Dryad is collaborating with talented and passionate professionals from across the globe who are dedicated to increasing the availably of open data. This summer, two new people were officially elected to serve on Dryad’s Board of Directors and we are excited to have them our governance team.

linJennifer Lin, Director of Product Management at Crossref, comes to us with lots of experience in product development and management, community outreach, scholarly communications, and more. Based in California, USA, Jennifer was instrumental in helping Dryad integrate our data submission system with PLOS journals during her tenure there. She is a data sharing evangelist, and passionate about tools for making data reusable and discoverable. We are thrilled to have her direct her energy and enthusiasm Dryad’s way.

nilssonJohan Nilsson is also new to the Dryad board and comes from the Oikos Editorial Office, a society-owned publishing foundation based at Lund University, Sweden. Johan’s past work has been as a research scientist in evolutionary ecology. He has a strong interest in scientific communication and social media engagement and focuses particularly on how the benefits of open science (and open data in particular) can be better expressed to researchers. We value his expertise and perspective into how Dryad can best serve its users.

dilloWe would be remiss if we didn’t also publicly welcome Ingrid Dillo, who was appointed to the board early in 2016. Ingrid is deputy director at DANS (Data Archiving and Networked Services). She holds a PhD in history and has a long record of policy development at DANS, the National Library of the Netherlands and Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. She is especially interested in research data management and the certification of trustworthy digital repositories. We are already relying on Ingrid’s expertise and learning from her work with groups like the Research Data Alliance.

Candidates to Dryad’s 12 member Board of Directors are nominated by Member organizations, and four of the Directors are elected or re-elected every year. Once on the Board, Directors serve as individuals rather than organizational representatives. The 12-member rotating Board aims for both diversity of perspective and depth of expertise. We are delighted to have achieved both with our new Directors. We welcome them onboard and wish to extend a heartfelt thanks to Directors past, present, and future for their contributions and dedication to Dryad’s mission.

Piloting new ways for funders to support data stewardship

whopays

The question of who should pay for the preservation and stewardship of open research data remains unresolved, at a time when journals and funders alike are adopting strong open data policies. As a non-profit repository that relies on financial support from members and users, we at Dryad deal with this question daily, and are eager to help find new and sustainable solutions.

Along these lines, if you submit your data to Dryad, you will soon notice that we will ask for information about your grant support. That’s because we’re running a pilot project with the US National Science Foundation (NSF) to test the feasibility of having a funding organization directly sponsor Data Publication Charges (DPCs).

During this pilot implementation, if your research was supported by a grant from the US NSF, and your DPC would not otherwise be waived or sponsored by another organization, this grant information can be used to charge the DPC directly to a fund set aside as part of this project.

nsf_flowchart

Entering grant information at data submission is optional. Nonetheless, we encourage researchers to fill out the funding information in order to benefit from NSF funds, enable awardees to receive credit from their institutions and funders for the open availability and reuse of the data, and to promote its discoverability.

Direct funder sponsorship of data archiving has some significant features:

Researchers also stand to benefit — they have an interest in seeing their data responsibly curated and preserved, even if they publish and archive data after their grant funds have expired.  And we are excited by the prospect of increasing the proportion of data packages for which the DPC is sponsored or waived (which is currently just over 2/3).

We aim to work out the details of achieving the goals above, and to evaluate any downsides, as part of the pilot. We will also be surveying researchers to better understand what happens when data is not sponsored by a payment plan. From that, we will be able to develop recommendations for what Dryad, funding organizations, and institutions can do to facilitate the DPC payment process for researchers.

We are grateful to the NSF Advances in Bioinformatics program for the supplemental funding behind this project, and we hope that many researchers will take advantage of the opportunity to have their DPC covered by the NSF funds, which will be available at least through February 2017.  Please let me know (at director@datadryad.org) if you have any questions or feedback!

Dryad’s first virtual community meeting: members share their expertise

On May 24, we held the first virtual Dryad Community Meeting, which allowed us to connect both with our membership and with the larger open data community, far and wide. The theme was “Leadership in data publishing: Dryad and learned societies.”

Following an introduction and update about Dryad from yours truly, we heard about the experiences from representatives of three of Dryad’s member societies.

All three societies require that data be archived in an appropriate repository as a condition of publication in their journals. Yet, they have each taken considerable time and effort to develop policies that address the needs and concerns of their different communities.

Bruna spoke about working with an audience that routinely gathers data for very long-term studies. For many Biotropica authors, embargoes are seen as an important prerequisite for data publishing. Their data policy “includes a generous embargo period of up to three years to ensure authors have ample time to publish multiple papers from more complex or long-term data sets”. Biotropica’s policy also recommends those “who re-use archived data sets to include as fully engaged collaborators the scientists who originally collected them”. To address initial resistance to data archiving, and to build understanding and consensus, Biotropica “enlisted its critics” to contribute to a paper discussing the pros and cons of data publication. Out of this process emerged an innovative policy that went into effect at the start of 2016.

Meaden, by contrast, noted that only 8% of Proceedings B authors elect to embargo data in Dryad, and the standard embargo is for only one year after publication. She credited clearer author instructions and a data availability statement in the manuscript submission system as key elements that have increased the availability of data associated with Royal Society publications.

Newton discussed BES’ move from “encouraging data publication” in 2012 to requiring it in 2014. As shown below, this resulted in an impressive increase in the availability of data. Next, the society is looking to develop guidance on data reuse etiquette. Newton noted that this effort would “need to be community-led.”

BES_data_preservation

Slide from Erika Newton’s presentation, illustrating the rise in data deposits for BES journals as associated with changing data policy.

While each speaker reported on unique challenges, all shared commonalities, such as:

  • involving the specific community in policy decisions
  • incrementally increasing efforts to make data available
  • the importance of clear author instructions 

We greatly appreciate the excellent contributions from the panelists, as well all the members and other attendees who participated and contributed to the lively Q&A.

We are also pleased that the virtual format was well received. In our follow-up survey, many of the attendees said they found it easy to ask questions and appreciated the ability to join remotely.

Our aim is that these meetings continue to be a valued forum for our diverse community of stakeholders to share knowledge and discuss emerging issues. If you have suggestions on topics for future meetings, or an interest in becoming a member, please reach out to me at director@datadryad.org.

dryad_members

 

Newly integrated titles from Oxford University Press Journals

oupDryad is very pleased to announce more integrations from charter member and partner Oxford University Press Journals. Oxford University Press (OUP) publishes over 300 journals, many with the support of learned societies. As part of Oxford University, OUP brings a rich history of working with researchers.

OUP has integrated seven more journals with Dryad, all of which can provide secure links to data during the peer review process:

oup_covers

  • Behavioral Ecology – published on behalf of  The International Society for Behavioral Ecology, Behavioral Ecology publishes studies on the whole range of behaving organisms, including plants, invertebrates, vertebrates, and humans. Data publication is sponsored for Behavioral Ecology authors.
  • BioScience – published on behalf of the American Institute of Biological Sciences, BioScience has been publishing current research in Biology since 1964.
  • Environmental Epigenetics is an open access journal that publishes research in any area of science and medicine related to the field of epigenetics.
  • Toxicological Sciences is the official journal of the Society of Toxicology and publishes influential research in toxicology. Data publication is sponsored for authors for Toxicological Sciences.
  • Journal of Urban Ecology is an open access journal which covers all aspects of urban environments. This includes the biology of the organisms that inhabit urban areas, the diversity of ecosystem services, and human social issues encountered within urban landscapes.
  • Virus Evolution serves the community of virologists, evolutionary biologists and ecologists who are interested in the genetic diversity and evolution of non-cellular forms of life.
  • Work, Aging and Retirement reflects a broad community of professionals in the fields of psychology, sociology, economics, gerontology, business and management, and industrial labor relations.

Integration with Dryad ensures bidirectional links between the article and the data, and increased visibility for both. It also simplifies the process of data submission for authors. All data in Dryad is reviewed by professional curators who perform basic checks to ensure discoverability and proper metadata, and becomes freely accessible online once approved.

Oxford University Press is increasing its commitment to authors and to quality by making it easy to publish datasets alongside the manuscript, and by allowing data to be available during the peer review process.

We’re delighted to build our partnership with Dryad by integrating this set of OUP journals. Providing authors with a simple and user-friendly route to data sharing helps to increase transparency and reproducibility of published research, and ultimately must be good for science. We hope to integrate more of our journals in the near future.

– Jennifer Boyd, Senior Publisher Life Science Journals, OUP

To learn more about journal integration with Dryad and DPCs, contact us.