2014 Dryad-Dataverse Community Meeting (updated)

BostonPanPlain2Updates: The originally scheduled keynote address from Phil Bourne will instead be a session on “The Future of Open Data – What to Expect from US Funders” with Jennie Larkin, Deputy Associate Director for Data Science at NIH and Peter McCartney, Program Director in the Division of Biological Infrastructure at NSF. Also, doors will open at 8:30 for a reception, at which light breakfast will be served.

We’re pleased to announce that our 2014 Community Meeting will be held on May 28 at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University.  This year’s meeting is being held jointly with the Dataverse Network Project, and the theme is Working Together on Data Discovery, Access and Reuse.

Many actors play a role in ensuring that research data is available for future knowledge discovery, including individual researchers, their institutions, publishers and funders. This joint community meeting will highlight existing solutions and emerging issues in the discovery, access and reuse of research data in the social and natural sciences.

Keynote speaker Dr. Phil Bourne is the first and newly appointed Associate Director for Data Science at the National Institutes of Health and a pioneer in furthering the free dissemination of science through new models of publishing. Prior to his NIH appointment, he was a Professor and Associate Vice Chancellor at the University of California San Diego.  He has over 300 papers and 5 books to his credit. Among his diverse contributions, he was the founding Editor-in-Chief of PLOS Computational Biology, has served as Associate Director of the RCSB Protein Data Bank, has launched four companies, most recently SciVee, and is a Past President of the International Society for Computational Biology. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the International Society for Computational Biology and the American Medical Informatics Association. Other honors he has received include the Benjamin Franklin Award in 2009 and the Jim Gray eScience Award in 2010.

The meeting will run from 8:30 9:00 am – 2:15 pm, including light breakfast and a catered lunch.  It will be followed by a Dryad Members Meeting, open to all attendees, from 2:30 – 3:30 pm.

There is no cost for registration, but space is limited. Onsite registration will be made available if space allows, and the proceedings will also be simulcast online.  Please see the meeting page for details.

This year’s Community Meeting has been scheduled for the convenience of those attending the Society for Scholarly Publishing Annual Meeting from May 28-30 in Boston.  SSP attendees may also wish to attend the session “The continuum from publishers to data repositories: models to support seamless scholarship”  May 29th from 10:45am-12:00pm.

For inquiries, please contact Laura Wendell (lwendell@datadryad.org) or Mercè Crosas (mcrosas@iq.harvard.edu).

The who, what, when and why of Data Publishing Charges

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As we announced earlier, Dryad will be introducing data publishing fees at the beginning of September. Here’s why we are doing this, and what it will mean for you as a submitter.

Why?

The Data Publishing Charge (DPC) is a modest fee that recovers the basic costs of curation and preservation, and allows Dryad to make its contents freely available for researchers and educators at any institution anywhere in the world.  DPCs provide a broad and fair revenue stream that scales with the costs of maintaining the repository, and helps ensure that Dryad can keep its commitment to long-term accessibility.

Who pays?

There are three cases:

  1. The DPC is waived in its entirety if the submitter is based in a country classified by the World Bank as a low-income or lower-middle-income economy.
  2. For many journals, the society or publisher will sponsor the DPC on behalf of their authors; you can see whether this applies to your journal here (the list is growing quickly, so be sure to check back when you are ready to submit new data).
  3. In the absence of a waiver or a sponsor, the DPC is US$80, payable by the submitter.  Payment details are accepted upon submission, but the fee will not be charged unless and until the data package is accepted for publication.

Two additional fees may apply. Submitters will be charged for data packages in excess of 10GB (US$15 for the first additional GB and US$10 for each GB thereafter), to cover additional storage costs.  If there is no sponsor, and the data package is associated with a journal lacking integrated data and manuscript submission, the submitter will be charged US$10 to cover the additional curation costs.

Submitters may use grant funds, institutional funds, or any other source, as long as payment can be made using a credit card or PayPal.  We regret that submitters cannot be invoiced for single submissions – but please do contact us if you are interested in purchasing a larger group of vouchers for future use.  We encourage researchers to inquire with librarians at their institution about available funding sources, and to budget data publication funds for future submissions into their grants, as part of their data management plan.

Note that there will be no charges for submissions made before the introduction of DPCs in September, regardless of when the data package is accepted for publication.

Help us spread the word

If your organization does not yet sponsor Data Publication Charges, or is not yet a Member, you may wish to let them know that you feel data archiving deserves their financial support.  Dryad offers a variety of flexible payment plans that provide for volume discounts, and there are additional discounts for Member organizations.  Organizations need not be publishers. Universities, funders, libraries and even individual research groups can purchase bundles of single-use vouchers that will cover the DPCs for data packages associated with publications appearing in any journal, as well as other publication types such as monographs and theses.  Prospective sponsors and Members may contact director@datadryad.org to figure out what will work best for their circumstances.

We are grateful for all the input we have received into our sustainability planning, and look forward to the continued support of our community in carrying out our nonprofit mission for many long years to come.  If you have questions or suggestions, please leave a comment or contact us here.

Submission fees to be introduced in September 2013

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Dryad is a nonprofit organization fully committed to making scientific and medical research data permanently available to all researchers and educators free-of-charge without barriers to reuse.  For the past four years, we have engaged experts and consulted with our many stakeholders in order to develop a sustainability plan that will ensure Dryad’s content remains free to users indefinitely.  The resulting plan allows Dryad to recoup its operating costs in a way that recovers revenues fairly and in a scalable manner.  The plan includes revenue from submission fees, membership dues, grants and contributions.

A one-time submission fee will offset the actual costs of preserving data in Dryad.  The majority of costs are incurred at the time of submission when curators process new files, and long-term storage costs scale with each submission, so this transparent one-time charge ensures that resources scale with demand.  Dryad offers a variety of pricing plans for journals and other organizations such societies, funders and libraries to purchase discounted submission fees on behalf of their researchers.  For data packages not covered by a pricing plan, the researcher pays upon submission.  Waivers are provided to researchers from developing economies.  See Pricing Plans for a complete list of fees and payment options.  Submission fees will apply to all new submissions starting September 2013.

Membership dues will supplement submission fees, allowing Dryad to maintain its strong ties to the research community through its volunteer Board of Directors, Annual Membership Meetings, and  other outreach activities to researchers, educators and stakeholder organizations.  See Membership Information.

Grants will fund research, development and innovation.

Donations will support all of the above efforts.  In addition, Dryad will occasionally appeal to donors to fund special projects or specific needs, such as preservation of valuable legacy datasets and deposit waivers for researchers from developing economies.

We are grateful for all the input we have received into our sustainability plan, and look forward to your continued support in carrying out our nonprofit mission for many long years to come.