New additions to the Dryad community

The Dryad community is expanding and diversifying! We’re excited to announce both the addition of a new institutional member and the results of our recent Board of Directors election.

New international institutional member

KAUST (The King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) has officially joined Dryad, thus furthering their aspirations to “be a destination for scientific and technological education and research.”KAUST logoWe hope KAUST will be the first of many global research institutions to join under our newly-launched institutional membership model.

To find out more and join yourself, go to datadryad.org/join.

Newly-elected Board members

Dryad Board of Directors elections are held annually, in conjunction with our member meeting. BOD members are elected or re-elected each year by the membership to serve 3-year terms. Our 12-member Board is meant to represent the various stakeholders in the Dryad community — publishers, researchers, technologists, funders, libraries and others.

Two of our current BOD members were eligible to run for a second term, and were re-elected to the Class of 2022. We’re thrilled to have Jennifer Lin and Johan Nilsson continue in their roles.

Meanwhile, please join us in welcoming two brand-new members to the Board:

Catriona MacCallum

Catriona MacCallum

Catriona MacCallum is Director of Open Science at Hindawi Ltd, London, UK. She has almost 20 years experience in scholarly publishing and 15 years in Open Access Publishing. She initially worked as Editor of Trends in Ecology & Evolution for Elsevier before joining the Open-Access publisher PLOS in 2003 to launch PLOS Biology as one of the Senior Editors. She also acted as a Consulting Editor on PLOS ONE, leaving PLOS as Advocacy Director in 2017. She is currently a member of the European Commission’s Open Science Policy Platform and the UKRI Open Access Practitioners Group.  She also serves on the Royal Society Board (Publishing), and is on the newly launched steering committee of DORA. She is a founding individual of I4OC (the Initiative for Open Citations) campaign. She has a PhD (on speciation) from the University of Edinburgh.

Naomi Penfold

Naomi Penfold. Photo credit: Orquidea Real Photobook – Julieta Sarmiento Photography

As Associate Director of ASAPbio, a non-profit organization promoting transparency and innovation in life sciences communication, Naomi Penfold is leading activities to engage the research community to promote the productive use of preprints in biology. She navigates the relationships between publishers, funders, researchers and consumers of science in order to drive innovation in the communication of life sciences research. Naomi is a CEFP2019 fellow with the AAAS’s Community Engagement Fellowship Programme, run by Lou Woodley and colleagues at the Center for Scientific Collaboration and Community Engagement. She learns and contributes to open science advocacy and innovation as an OpenCon alumnus, Mozilla Science community contributor and through advisory and organising roles with multiple open science projects (OpenAsInBook club; PREreview) and events (ResearchObject 2018 workshop; Open Access week 2018; OpenCon 2017). Prior to joining ASAPbio, Naomi worked as Innovation Officer (2016-2018) and Events Coordinator (2016) with eLife, and was a Wellcome Trust science policy intern with the Academy of Medical Sciences in the UK. Naomi graduated with a PhD in Clinical Biochemistry from the University of Cambridge in 2017.
Further information: https://asapbio.org/dt_team/naomi-penfold

Catriona and Naomi will assume their duties starting at the next BOD meeting in August.

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Lastly, a note of enormous gratitude to outgoing BOD member Alf Eaton, and also to Charles Fox, a long-serving Dryad Director and our outgoing Chair. We couldn’t have done it without you!

Most popular data from 2018

As we begin a new year and celebrate the major milestone of more than 25,000 data packages published, it’s a great time to highlight the value for re-use of the scholarly resources that are openly available and licensed in Dryad. 

So, which data packages published in 2018 have received the most downloads? Here are some at the top of the list.

Whale songs

Stafford et al (2018) Extreme diversity in the songs of Spitsbergen’s bowhead whales 

Here’s a lovely example of “data” that can have uses well beyond research. We’d love to know what people might be doing with these audio files. Meditating to them? Incorporating them into musical compositions?

whale

All about the data

It’s perhaps not surprising that Dryad data packages associated with Scientific Data get a lot of downloads, as they are a journal specifically for “descriptions of scientifically valuable datasets, and research that advances the sharing and reuse of scientific data.” These three resources are proving especially popular:

  • Bennett et al (2018) GlobTherm, a global database on thermal tolerances for aquatic and terrestrial organisms
  • Faraut et al (2018) Dataset of human medial temporal lobe single neuron activity during declarative memory encoding and recognition 
  • Kummu et al (2018) Gridded global datasets for Gross Domestic Product and Human Development Index over 1990-2015 

screen shot 2019-01-24 at 2.13.10 pm

Avian functional traits

Storchová L, Hořák D (2018) Life-history characteristics of European birds

europeanrobinThis is an example of a dataset compiled specifically for re-use. According to the authors, “Recently, functional aspects of avian diversity have been used frequently in comparative analyses as well as in community ecology studies; thus, open access to complete datasets of traits will be valuable.” To make the data as useful as possible, they included a broad spectrum of traits and provided the file in an accessible format: ASCII text, tab delimited, not compressed. Given the large number of downloads, it has indeed proven valuable!

Improving clinical research transparency

Kilicoglu et al (2018) Automatic recognition of self-acknowledged limitations in clinical research literature

Here’s another dataset created for the purpose of improving research — in this case, reporting of limitations in clinical studies. The machine-learning techniques tested here can be incorporated into the workflows of other projects, to support efforts in increasing transparency.

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Huge thanks are due to researchers who take the time and effort to publish their data, to the journals who support them in doing so (including those highlighted above), and to the Dryad member organizations who make it all possible. Here’s to the next 25,000, and the millions of downloads they will produce!

 

Dryad celebrates international data

There’s been important discussion lately about how to make research more inclusive, equitable, diverse, and global. See the recent 2018 International Open Access Week, and International Data Week, happening now in Gaborne, Botswana, with the theme “Digital Frontiers of Global Science.”

Dryad is among these organizations seeking to provide sustainable, open scholarly infrastructure that is accessible to all. As such, we use the CC0 license exclusively, and offer fee waivers for researchers based in countries classified by the World Bank as low-income or lower-middle-income economies. Our burgeoning partnership with California Digital Library promises to make data publishing even easier for all researchers.

In celebration of a global perspective, the Dryad curation team has selected a few data packages that highlight both a wide geographic range and a collaborative approach to research projects.

Penguin imaging and classification in Antarctica

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Data from: Time-lapse imagery and volunteer classifications from the Zooniverse Penguin Watch project / associated article in Scientific Data

Data from: A remote-controlled observatory for behavioural and ecological research: a case study on emperor penguins / associated article in Methods in Ecology and Evolution

Antarctica may be a fine spot for penguins, but the cold conditions make it an inhospitable location for human beings to spend long periods. It is especially challenging for scientists engaged in gathering data under the frigid conditions and for their equipment. Two recent Dryad data packages highlight how scientists have addressed this chilly challenge with the use of remote observation systems. One provides data from a remote‐controlled system designed for information gathering, and the other employs citizen science to process large numbers of time-lapse images gathered remotely from an automated system.

The images that comprise the data from the Zooniverse project Penguin Watch are much more than just cool photos of penguins. They are the result of automated time-lapse cameras used for reliably and consistently monitoring wild penguin populations. The data includes 73,802 photos captured by 15 different Penguin Watch cameras, and the authors expressed the hope that annotated time-lapse imagery can be used to train machine learning algorithms to extract data automatically and perhaps for computer vision development.

The video and images from Richter et al. were taken by a self-sufficient remote-controlled observatory designed to operate year-round in extreme cold-weather conditions. The observatory has been capturing high-resolution images of penguins, along with other data, since 2013 using “multiple overview cameras and a high-resolution steerable camera with a telephoto lens.” The resulting images and video provide information on the life cycle, demographics, and behavior of the animals. For example, the dataset shows how the movement of penguins as individuals and as a group might be associated with the speed and direction of the wind.

Both datasets show how remote observation systems can be used by human investigators in various locations to collect data on animal populations, even in areas of the world which provide challenges to scientists.

— Debra Fagan

Collaborating across disciplines in Indonesia

 

Data from: Competing for blood: the ecology of parasite resource competition in human malaria-helminth co-infections / associated article in Ecology Letters

An international team of researchers reveal new knowledge about “co-infections,” multiple infectious diseases that attack the immune system at once. Budischak et al. (2018) used principles of ecological theory to answer questions about helminth-malaria co-infection in human hosts. Rather than measuring prevalence of malaria after deworming, as previous studies had done with varied results, Budischak et al. measured the density of specific species within an individual over time.

The researchers hypothesized that competition for resources, in this case red blood cells, would have an affect on the density of those species within the host. Data and samples originally collected for a 2 year placebo-controlled deworming trial in Indonesia were analyzed, and they found that when bloodsucking helminth species were removed, the density of Plasmodium vivax, which rely specifically on young red blood cells, increased 2.75-fold. This increase is enough to adversely affect the health of an individual, and heighten the chances that mosquitoes will transmit the P. vivax from one individual to another.

The researchers suggest that where resources allow, health care providers should consider the specific species that are co-infecting an individual, and weigh the cost-benefits of deworming at that time. These findings lay the groundwork for novel treatments of malaria and worm infections.

— Erin Clary

Assessing the potential of environmental citizen science in East Africa

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Data from: Developing the global potential of citizen science: Assessing opportunities that benefit people, society and the environment in East Africa / associated article in the Journal of Applied Ecology

Citizen science projects often suffer from limited visibility in developing countries. Recognizing this difficulty, these authors undertook a collaborative process with experts to assess the potential for environmental citizen science in East Africa. The .csv file published in Dryad contains scores given by workshop participants in relation to various opportunities, benefits and barriers, which serve as the basis for principles that are applicable more widely.

Importantly, the project emphasizes the benefits of citizen science not just to the natural environment, but for creating a more informed and empowered populace.

Fighting lupus in Latin America

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Data from: First Latin American clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosusassociated article in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

Dryad recently published data underlying collaborative research by the Latin American Group for the Study of Lupus (GLADEL) and the Pan-American League of Associations of Rheumatology (PANLAR). Both groups consisted of experienced Latin American rheumatologists who gathered together in Panama City to discuss special problems faced by patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Latin America.

The group started the research process by putting together a list of questions addressing clinical issues most commonly seen in Latin American patients. The team used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system to answer these questions with the best available evidence. Summarized preliminary findings were used to develop a framework for therapies and treatments. The underlying dataset published by Dryad consists of tables describing the groups’ main findings of therapeutic interventions by organ/systems in SLE using the GRADE approach.

This dataset has potential for reuse and would be an excellent resource for the of study of lupus in the hopes of improving outcomes in Latin America and worldwide.

— Shavon Stewart

Dryad welcomes Scheld as new Executive Director

Dryad is excited to announce the appointment of Melissanne Scheld as Executive Director.

Melissanne joins as Dryad embarks upon our 10th year of providing open, not-for-profit infrastructure for scholarly data, and as we begin a strategic partnership with California Digital Library (CDL) to address researcher needs by leading an open, community-supported initiative in research data curation and publishing.

We are pleased Melissanne is joining us at this auspicious point in Dryad’s trajectory. With over 25 years of experience working with the academic community, and with her knowledge of the scholarly communications industry, we are confident she will successfully lead Dryad into our second decade as a community-supported provider of open data services.

–Charles Fox, Dryad Board of Directors Chairperson and Professor, University of Kentucky

Melissanne most recently served as Managing Director of Publishers Communication Group, a scholarly publishing consultancy, and has previously held positions at the university presses of Cambridge, New York University, and Columbia.

To welcome our new ED and/or inquire about ways to get involved with Dryad, send an email to director@datadryad.org.

Introducing the Dryad BOD Class of 2021

We are thrilled to announce the latest additions to the Dryad Board of Directors.

Our 12-member Board is intended to be a diverse group, with a mix of background and skills useful to represent the various stakeholders in the Dryad community — publishers, researchers, technologists, funders, and libraries. BOD members are elected or re-elected each year by the membership to serve 3-year terms.

New members for 2018-2021

The following individuals have assumed their duties:

horstmannWolfram Horstmann has been Director of Göttingen State and University Library since 2014. Prior to that, he was Associate Director at the Bodleian Libraries of the University of Oxford, UK and CIO at Bielefeld University, Germany. He is Professor at the Information School of the Humboldt University in Berlin, teaching Electronic Publishing, Open Access and Open Science. He is biologist by training and worked on the epistemology of simulations for his doctoral thesis. Read more about Wolfram.

mangiaficoPaolo Mangiafico is the Scholarly Communications Strategist at Duke University and Director of the Scholarly Communication Institute. In his role at Duke, Paolo works with librarians, technologists, faculty, students and university leadership to plan and implement programs that promote greater reach and impact for scholarship in many forms, including open access to publications and data and emerging platforms for publishing digital scholarship.

suttonCaroline Sutton is Director of Editorial Development with Taylor & Francis. Before joining the company in October 2016, she was co-founder of Co-Action Publishing, a full OA publisher. She helped to found and served as the first President of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA) and is a member of the present board.  At Taylor & Francis, Caroline has led efforts to roll out data sharing policies as well as initiatives related to open scholarship across subject areas.

uhlirPaul Uhlir, J.D. is a consultant in information policy and management. He was Scholar at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC in 2015-2016, and Director of its Board on Research Data and Information, 2008-2015. He was employed at the NAS in various capacities from 1985-2016. Paul has won several prizes from the NAS and the international CODATA in data policy, and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Read more detailed information about his professional activities.

Officers for 2018-2019

Shout-out to our new slate of Board officers:

  • Charles Fox (Chair)
  • Johan Nilsson (Vice-chair)
  • Brian Hole (continuing as Treasurer)
  • Fiona Murphy (Secretary)

Ex Officio members

Filling out the Board roster are two members in Ex Officio (non-voting) status. We are thankful that Todd Vision, longtime BOD member and PI of grants supporting Dryad, will continue to serve. We also welcome Günter Waibel, Associate Vice Provost and Executive Director of California Digital Library, in this capacity to represent our recently-announced partnership with the CDL.

Finally, we wish to express our sincere appreciation to outgoing BOD members and officers for their work on behalf of Dryad and open data.

Dryad partnering with CDL to accelerate data publishing

Two cheetahs running

Image credit Cat Specialist Group, catsg.org

Dryad is thrilled to announce a strategic partnership with California Digital Library (CDL) to address researcher needs by leading an open, community-supported initiative in research data curation and publishing.

Dryad was founded 10 years ago with the mission of providing open, not-for-profit infrastructure for data underlying the scholarly literature, and the vision of promoting a world where research data is openly available and routinely re-used to create knowledge.

20,000 data publications later, that message has clearly resonated. The Dryad model of embedding data publication within journal workflows has proven highly effective, and combined with our data curation expertise, has made Dryad a name that is both known and trusted in the research community. But a lot has changed in the data publishing space since 2008, and Dryad needs to change with it.

Who/what is CDL?

CDL LoroCDL was founded by the University of California in 1997 to take advantage of emerging technologies that were transforming the way digital information was being published and accessed. Since then, in collaboration with the UC libraries and other partners, they have assembled one of the world’s leading digital research libraries and changed the ways that faculty, students, and researchers discover and access information.

CDL has long-standing interest and experience in research data management (RDM) and data publishing. CDL’s digital curation program, the University of California Curation Center (UC3), provides digital preservation, data curation, and data publishing services, and has a history of coordinating collaborative projects regionally, nationally, and internationally. It is baked into CDL’s strategic vision to build partnerships to better promote and make an impact in the library, open research, and data management spaces (e.g., DMPTool, HathiTrust).

Why a partnership?

CDL and Dryad have a shared mission of increasing the adoption and availability of open data. By joining forces, we can have a much bigger impact. This partnership is focused on combining CDL’s institutional relationships, expertise, and nimble technology with Dryad’s position in the researcher community, curation workflows, and publisher relationships. By working together, we plan to create global efficiencies and minimize needless duplication of effort across institutions, freeing up time and funds, and, in particular, allowing institutions with fewer resources to support research data publishing and ensure data remain open.

Our joint Dryad-CDL initiative will increase adoption of open data by meeting researchers where they already are. We will leverage the strengths of both organizations to offer new products and services and to build broad, sustainable, and productive approaches to data curation. We plan to move quickly to provide new value:

  • For researchers: We will launch a new, modern and easier-to-use platform. This will provide a higher level of service, and even more seamless integration into regular workflows than Dryad currently offers
  • For journals and publishers: We will offer new integration paths that will allow direct communication with manuscript processing systems, better reporting, and more comprehensive curation services
  • For academic institutions: We will work directly with institutions to craft right-sized offerings to meet your needs

We have many details to hammer out and a lot of work to do, but among our first steps will be to reach out to you — each of the groups above — to discuss your needs, wants, and preferred methods of supporting this effort. With your help, the partnership will help us grow Dryad as a globally-accessible, community-led, non-commercial, low-cost service that focus on breaking down silos between publishing, libraries, and research.

As this partnership is taking shape, we ask for community input on how our collective efforts can best meet the needs of researchers, publishers, and institutions. Please stay tuned for further announcements and information over the coming months. We hope you share our excitement as we step into Dryad’s next chapter.

Dryad and the GDPR

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a major piece of data privacy legislation coming into effect on May 25, 2018. GDPR will apply to all companies processing the personal data of all European Union residents, regardless of the company’s location.

We’d like to take this opportunity to emphasize that Dryad respects the privacy of our users and submitters and works to protect all personally identifiable information we collect, which is limited to names and contact information. We have an existing privacy policy to which submitters agree when they create a Dryad profile, and again when they submit data. Some steps we will be taking:

  • Reviewing our privacy policy to ensure it conforms to GDPR requirements;
  • Reviewing the parts of our system where submitters provide and maintain personal data, ensuring that there are links to the privacy policy, and that actions to control one’s personal data are clear; and
  • Reviewing the methods we use to communicate with submitters, users, and others to ensure that you do not receive unwanted emails.

If you are concerned about the accuracy of personally identifiable information maintained by Dryad, wish to review, access, or correct this information, or would like your information removed from Dryad’s records, you may contact us anytime at help@datadryad.org.