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We are pleased to share below the text of a press release from Elsevier, announcing use of this image to direct viewers of online articles to the underlying data in Dryad. Dryad_web_banner_small_v4eSee below for sample articles; the image displays on the right sidebar, under Applications and Tools. This Dryad widget may be used by any publisher or journal to facilitate access to related publicly available data that authors have archived in Dryad.

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, and the Dryad Digital Repository, a leading archive for scientific and medical research data, today announced that they have implemented two-way linking between their respective content.

The Dryad Digital Repository provides facilities for archiving, discovery and accessibility of data files associated with any published article in the sciences or medicine, as well as software scripts and other files important to the article. Dryad is a nonprofit organization committed to its mission of making data publicly available for research and educational reuse. All data files stored in Dryad receive persistent, resolvable Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to ensure their proper citation.

Scientific and medical research datasets stored by Dryad for research articles published in 28 Elsevier journals can now be immediately accessed from the online articles on ScienceDirect and vice versa. This allows readers to easily find the background information they need in order to develop a deeper understanding of the article, and also helps to place the article in a larger context.

Dr. Todd Vision, Associate Director for Informatics at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center and Principal Investigator on the primary NSF grant funding Dryad since 2008, said, “We are delighted to work with Elsevier in cementing the union between scientific articles and research data. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution was one of the first journals that joined the Dryad consortium and we would like to applaud them for recognizing that the integrity, rigor, and long-term impact of the science published by the journal is strengthened by archiving the associated data at the time of publication. We also believe that authors themselves will ultimately benefit, in the form of increased citations and other forms of professional credit, for making their data available for others to reuse.”

Dr. Derek Wildman, Editor in Chief of Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, a journal which has successfully incorporated and uses the reciprocal linking option between Dyrad and ScienceDirect, said, “DNA sequence data serves as the basis for the majority of the studies we publish. Dryad has done an excellent job in establishing a public archive for all types of data used in evolutionary biology. By making these data sets public and allowing for direct linking between a published research papers, scientists can more efficiently build on the work of their predecessors, strengthening scientific research enterprise. We see the incorporation of the two-way linking as a win for all parties.”

The first 28 journals hosted on ScienceDirect to feature the reciprocal linking option, displayed in the right hand sidebar of the online article page view, are:

  • Animal Behaviour
  • Applied Soil Ecology
  • Behavioural Processes
  • Biological Conservation
  • Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part D, Genomics and Proteomics
  • Ecological Indicators
  • Environmental Pollution
  • Fisheries Research
  • Fungal Genetics and Biology
  • Gene
  • Hormones and Behavior
  • Infection, Genetics and Evolution
  • International Journal for Parasitology
  • Journal of Biomedical Informatics
  • Journal of Human Evolution
  • Journal of Informetrics
  • Marine Genomics
  • Molecular and Biochemical Parasitology
  • Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
  • Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
  • Protist
  • Quaternary Science Reviews
  • Science of the Total Environment
  • Soil Biology and Biochemistry
  • Theoretical Population Biology
  • Toxicon
  • Trends in Ecology and Evolution
  • Virus Research

This type of linking between articles and data is one of the pillars of Article of the Future, Elsevier’s on-going program to improve the format of the scientific article. Elsevier collaborates with more than thirty data repositories, and is continually looking to collaborate with other relevant organizations.

View article examples on ScienceDirect:

R. Alexander Pyron, John J. Wiens, A large-scale phylogeny of Amphibia including over 2800 species, and a revised classification of extant frogs, salamanders, and caecilians, Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Volume 61, Issue 2, November 2011, pp. 543-583, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2011.06.012.

Peter J. Unmack, Gerald R. Allen, Jerald B. Johnson, Phylogeny and biogeography of rainbowfishes (Melanotaeniidae) from Australia and New Guinea, Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Volume 67, Issue 1, April 2013, pp. 15-27, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.12.019.

James Starrett, Marshal Hedin, Nadia Ayoub, Cheryl Y. Hayashi, Hemocyanin gene family evolution in spiders (Araneae), with implications for phylogenetic relationships and divergence times in the infraorder Mygalomorphae, Gene, Volume 524, Issue 2, July 2013, pp. 175-186, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gene.2013.04.037.

Mercy Y. Akinyi, Jenny Tung, Maamun Jeneby, Nilesh B. Patel, Jeanne Altmann, Susan C. Alberts, Role of grooming in reducing tick load in wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus), Animal Behaviour, Volume 85, Issue 3, March 2013, pp. 559-568, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.12.012

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About Dryad

The Dryad Digital Repository is a curated resource that makes the data underlying scientific and medical publications discoverable, freely reusable, and citable. By providing a general-purpose home for a wide diversity of data types, Dryad benefits individual researchers, educators and students as well as a diversity of stakeholder organizations. Dryad is a member-based nonprofit organization incorporated in North Carolina, USA with users around the world.

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier’s online solutions include ScienceDirect, Scopus, Reaxys, ClinicalKey and Mosby’s Suite, which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, and the SciVal suite and MEDai’s Pinpoint Review, which help research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively.

A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group plc, a world leading provider of professional information solutions. The group employs more than 30,000 people, including more than 15,000 in North America. Reed Elsevier Group plc is owned equally by two parent companies, Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. Their shares are traded on the London, Amsterdam and New York Stock Exchanges using the following ticker symbols: London: REL; Amsterdam: REN; New York: RUK and ENL.

Media contact

Dale Seaton
Executive Publisher, Journals
Elsevier
+1 212 633 3862
d.seaton@elsevier.com
 
**Update: In addition to DOIs, the banner widget also works with PubMed IDs

Photo by David Iliff; license: CC-BY-SA 3.0

Dryad invites current members, prospective members, and other interested parties to attend the Annual Membership Meeting in Oxford, UK on the 24th of May.  This is the first open meeting of the newly incorporated organization and will be the last membership meeting before the introduction of deposit fees in September.  Attendees will learn about recent developments, get a preview of upcoming features, have a say in the governance of the organization, and weigh in on topics of relevance to the future of Dryad, its members and partner journals.  Speakers scheduled to present emerging issues include:

  • Marianne Bamkin of JoRD – Model journal policies and implementation
  • Jonathan Tedds  of PREPARDE - Review of data associated with publications
  • Simon Hodson of JISC – The use of grant funds for data archiving costs
  • Sarah Callaghan of the CODATA-ICSTI Task Group on Data Citation – Data citation principles
  • Martin Fenner of PLOS ALM – Tracking data usage and impact
  • Eefke Smit of STM – The how and why of repository certification
  • Susanna Assunta-Sansone of ISA and BioSharing - Helping researchers to collect, curate, analyse, share and publish data.
  • Bill Michener of DataONE – Relevance of the DataNet program to Dryad

The Membership Meeting will cap off a series of exciting events spotlighting trends in scholarly communication and research data:

  • The Now and Future of Data Publishing on 22 May – A daylong program featuring new initiatives and current issues in data publishing. Organized by the JISC together with a range of organizations including BioSharingDataONESTM and Wiley-Blackwell.
  • The ORCID Outreach meeting on the morning of 23 May and ORCID CodeFest from 23-24 May
  • A joint Dryad-ORCID Symposium on Research Attribution on the afternoon of 23 May.  The symposium will address the changing culture and technology of how credit is assigned and tracked for data, software, and other research outputs.  Keynote speakers Johanna McEntyre (Europe PubMed Central) and David DeRoure (Oxford eResearch Centre) will be joined by panelists Liz Allen (Wellcome Trust), Christine Borgmann (UCLA), Martin Fenner (PLOS), Neil Chue Hong (Software Sustainability Institute), Trish Groves (BMJ), John Kaye (British Library) and moderator Cameron Neylon (PLOS) to address the many faces of the issue.

You may register for events separately here and here through May 13th.  A block of rooms has been set aside at the Malmaison Hotel; enter corporate code OXER900 to receive a discounted rate. Please consult the Dryad membership meeting website closer to the event if you are interested in viewing the webcast.

We hope to see you there!

We are celebrating the recent publication in Dryad of the first data to accompany a book [1, 2]. Odd Couples: Extraordinary Differences Between the Sexes in the Animal Kingdom, from Princeton University Press, examines the occasionally surprising gender differences in animals, and what it means to be male or female in the animal kingdom. It is intended for both general and scientific readers.

The author, Daphne Fairbairn, a professor of biology at the University of California, Riverside, and Editor-in-Chief of Evolution, a Dryad partner journal, describes the data as:

…a survey of all recorded sexual dimorphisms in all of the animal classes that contain dioecious species (species with separate sexes).  It categorizes the prevalence of dioecy, the types of differences between the sexes (size, shape, color, etc.) and the magnitude of the differences.  I use this survey to construct frequency plots in the book, but there was no room to publish the full survey results.  This is the first time that such a survey has been done and I am hoping that it will prove useful to other biologists who might use the data for hypothesis testing.  I might even get around to this myself!

I think these archived data are one of the most significant contributions of the book to the scientific literature, even though they will not be important for non-specialist readers.

While most data in Dryad accompany journal articles, we are happy to see data archiving catching on with other types of publications such as books, thesis dissertations and conference proceedings.  Please contact us if you are interested in submitting data and have any questions about its suitability for Dryad.

[1] Fairbairn DJ (2013) Data from: Odd couples: extraordinary differences between the sexes in the animal kingdom. Dryad Digital Repository. doi:10.5061/dryad.n48cm

[2] Fairbairn DJ (2013) Odd Couples: Extraordinary Differences Between the Sexes in the Animal Kingdom, Princeton University Press, ISBN:9780691141961.

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Dryad is a nonprofit organization fully committed to making scientific and medical research data permanently available to all researchers and educators free-of-charge without barriers to reuse.  For the past four years, we have engaged experts and consulted with our many stakeholders in order to develop a sustainability plan that will ensure Dryad’s content remains free to users indefinitely.  The resulting plan allows Dryad to recoup its operating costs in a way that recovers revenues fairly and in a scalable manner.  The plan includes revenue from submission fees, membership dues, grants and contributions.

A one-time submission fee will offset the actual costs of preserving data in Dryad.  The majority of costs are incurred at the time of submission when curators process new files, and long-term storage costs scale with each submission, so this transparent one-time charge ensures that resources scale with demand.  Dryad offers a variety of pricing plans for journals and other organizations such societies, funders and libraries to purchase discounted submission fees on behalf of their researchers.  For data packages not covered by a pricing plan, the researcher pays upon submission.  Waivers are provided to researchers from developing economies.  See Pricing Plans for a complete list of fees and payment options.  Submission fees will apply to all new submissions starting September 2013.

Membership dues will supplement submission fees, allowing Dryad to maintain its strong ties to the research community through its volunteer Board of Directors, Annual Membership Meetings, and  other outreach activities to researchers, educators and stakeholder organizations.  See Membership Information.

Grants will fund research, development and innovation.

Donations will support all of the above efforts.  In addition, Dryad will occasionally appeal to donors to fund special projects or specific needs, such as preservation of valuable legacy datasets and deposit waivers for researchers from developing economies.

We are grateful for all the input we have received into our sustainability plan, and look forward to your continued support in carrying out our nonprofit mission for many long years to come.

seed-2We encourage you to visit the Dryad homepage today and check out our new look.  We’ve made many changes, both large and small, and added lots of new content.

Highlights include:

  • A new Ideas Forum, where you can let us know what features you’d like us to work on next, upvote or comment on ideas submitted by others, and check back to see our responses.
  • New membership and pricing plans, which we will feature in upcoming posts.
  • Updates about our  Annual Membership Meeting and related events from 22-24 May in Oxford, UK.
  • An Integrated Journals page that helps depositors see which journals are coordinating the submission process with Dryad, figure out which stage in the publication process to submit data for your chosen journal, and more.
  • Prominent positioning of Dryad’s Terms of Service, which we view as a two-way compact with our users. We wrote it in plain language and sincerely want it to be read!
  • Improved accessibility to persons with visual disabilities (following the guidelines in Section 508 of the U.S. code)
  • Improved navigation, including an integrated page of Frequently Asked Questions
  • More intuitive search and browse of data packages and a revamped layout for the data package page

There are lots more improvements underway.  Not all of these will be immediately obvious to website visitors, but you can expect to see more changes over the coming months.  Thanks to all who have provided feedback and helped with usability testing, and please let us know what you think!

Dryad is pleased to announce that a diverse array of new partner journals have completed submission integration during the first quarter of 2013.  Authors to these journals will benefit from streamlined data deposition, while the journals will benefit from enhancement of the articles through a tighter linkage to the underlying data.

Submission integration is completely free, and can be implemented with a wide variety of manuscript submission systems.  We welcome inquiries from other journals that wish to integrate submission with Dryad, and encourage authors from non-integrated journals to let their editors know if it is a service that they would value.

gms2

  • eLife is a prestigious new open-access journal published by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute,  the Max Planck Society, and the Wellcome Trust.
    elife
  • Journal of Open Public Health Data (JOPHD) is a new journal from Ubiquity Press that publishes peer-reviewed data papers describing public health datasets with high reuse potential.  The data itself must be made freely available in a public repository.

jophd

Each journal that integrates with Dryad chooses whether to have authors archive their data prior to peer review or after manuscript acceptance.  Of these six journals, GMS Medical Sciences, eLife, and the Journal of Open Public Health Data chose to have their authors submit data prior to peer review.

heatherMarch2013A study providing new insights into the citation boost from open data has been released in preprint form on PeerJ by Dryad researchers Heather Piwowar and Todd Vision. The researchers looked at thousands of papers reporting new microarray data and thousands of cited instances of data reuse. They found that the citation boost, while more modest than seen in earlier studies (overall, ~9%), was robust to confounding factors, distributed across many archived datasets, continued to grow for at least five years after publication, and was driven to a large extent by actual instances of data reuse. Furthermore, they found that the intensity of dataset reuse has been rising steadily since 2003.

Heather, a post-doc based in Vancouver, may be known to readers of this blog for her earlier work on data sharing, her blog, her role as cofounder of ImpactStory, or her work to promote access to the literature for text mining. Recently Tim Vines, managing editor of Molecular Ecology and a past member of Dryad’s Consortium Board, managed to pull Heather briefly away from her many projects to ask her about her background and latest passions:

TV: Your research focus over the last five years has been on data archiving and science publishing- how did your interest in this field develop?

HP: I wanted to reuse data.  My background is electrical engineering and digital signal processing: I worked for tech companies for 10 years. The most recent was a biotech developing predictive chemotherapy assays. Working there whetted my appetite for doing research, so I went back to school for my PhD to study personalized cancer therapy.

My plan was to use data that had already been collected, because I’d seen first-hand the time and expense that goes into collecting clinical trials data.  Before I began, though, I wanted to know if the stuff in NCBI’s databases was good quality, because highly selective journals like Nature often require data archiving, or was it instead mostly the dregs of research because that was all investigators were willing to part with.  I soon realized that no one knew… and that it was important, and we should find out.  Studying data archiving and reuse became my new PhD topic, and my research passion.

My first paper was rejected from a High Profile journal.  Next I submitted it to PLOS Biology. It was rejected from there too, but they mentioned they were starting this new thing called PLOS ONE.  I read up (it hadn’t published anything yet) and I liked the idea of reviewing only for scientific correctness.

I’ve become more and more of an advocate for all kinds of open science as I’ve run into barriers that prevented me from doing my best research.  The barriers kept surprising me. Really, other fields don’t have a PubMed? Really, there is no way to do text mining across all scientific literature?  Seriously, there is no way to query that citation data by DOI, or export it other than page by page in your webapp, and you won’t sell subscriptions to individuals?  For real, you won’t let me cite a URL?  In this day and age, you don’t value datasets as contributions in tenure decisions?  I’m working for change.

TV: You’ve been involved with a few of the key papers relating data archiving to subsequent citation rate. Could you give us a quick summary of what you’ve found?

HP: Our 2007 PLOS ONE paper was a small analysis related to one specific data type: human cancer gene expression microarray data.  About half of the 85 publications in my sample had made their data publicly available.  The papers with publicly available data received about 70% more citations than similar studies without available data.

I later discovered there had been an earlier study in the field of International Studies — it has the awesome title “Posting your data: will you be scooped or will you be famous?”  There have since been quite a few additional studies of this question, the vast majority finding a citation benefit for data archiving.  Have a look at (and contribute to!) this public Mendeley group initiated by Joss Winn.

There was a significant limitation to these early studies: they didn’t control for several of important confounders of citation rate (number of authors, of example).  Thanks to Angus Whyte at the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) for conversations on this topic.  Todd Vision and I have been working on a larger study of data citation and data reuse to address this, and understand deeper patterns of data reuse.  Our conclusions:

After accounting for other factors affecting citation rate, we find a robust citation benefit from open data, although a smaller one than previously reported.  We conclude there is a direct effect of third-party data reuse that persists for years beyond the time when researchers have published most of the papers reusing their own data.  Other factors that may also contribute to the citation boost are considered. We further conclude that, at least for gene expression microarray data, a substantial fraction of archived datasets are reused, and that the intensity of dataset reuse has been steadily increasing since 2003.

TV: Awareness of data archiving and its importance for the progress of science has increased massively over the past five years, but very few organizations have actually introduced mandatory archiving policies. What do you see as the remaining obstacles?

HP: Great question. I don’t know. Someone should do a study!  Several journals have told me it is simply not a high priority for them: it takes time to write and decide on a policy, and they don’t have time.  Perhaps wider awareness of the Joint Data Archiving Policy will help.

Some journals are afraid authors will choose a competitor journal if they impose additional requirements. I’m conducting a study to monitor the attitudes, experiences, and practices of authors in journals that have adopted JDAP policy and similar authors who publish elsewhere.  The study will run for 3 years, so although I have more than 2500 responses there is still another whole year of data collection to go.  Stay tuned :)

Keep an eye on Journal Research Data Policy Bank (JoRD) to stay current on journal policies for data archiving.

Funders, though.  Why aren’t more funders introducing mandatory public data archiving policies (with appropriate exceptions)?  I don’t know.  They should.  Several are taking steps towards it, but golly it is slow.  Is anyone thinking of the opportunity cost of moving this slowly?  More specific thoughts in my National Science Foundation RFI response with coauthor Todd Vision.

TV: You’re a big advocate of ‘open notebook’ science. How did you first get interested in working in this way?

HP: I was a grad student, hungry for information.  I wanted to know if everyone’s science looked like my science.  Was it messy in the same ways?  What processes did they have that I could learn from?  What were they are excited about *now* — findings and ideas that wouldn’t hit journal pages for months or years?

This was the same time that Jean-Claude Bradley was starting to talk about open notebook science in his chemistry lab.  I was part of the blogosphere conversations, and had a fun ISMB 2007 going around to all the publisher booths asking about their policies on publishing results that had previously appeared on blogs and wikis (my blog posts from the time; for a current resource see the list of journal responses maintained by F1000 Posters).

TV: It’s clearly a good way to work for people whose work is mainly analysis of data, but how can the open notebook approach be adapted to researchers who work at the bench or in the field?

HP: Jean-Claude Bradley has shown it can work well very in a chemistry lab.  I haven’t worked in the field, so I don’t want to presume to know what is possible or easy: guessing in many cases it wouldn’t be easy.  That said, more often than not, where there is a will there is a way!

TV: Given the growing concerns over the validity of the results in scientific papers, do you think that external supervision of scientists (i.e. mandated open notebook science) would ever become a reality?

HP: I’m not sure.  Such a policy may well have disadvantages that outweigh its advantages.  It does sound like a good opportunity to do some research, doesn’t it?  A few grant programs could have a precondition that the awardees be randomized to different reporting requirements, then we monitor and see what happens. Granting agencies ought to be doing A LOT MORE EXPERIMENTING to learn the implications of their policies, followed by quick and open dissemination of the results of the experiments, and refinements in policies to reflect this growing evidence-base.

TV: You’re involved in a lot of initiatives at the moment. Which ones are most exciting for you? 

HP: ImpactStory.  The previous generation of tools for discovering the impact of research are simply not good enough.  We need ways to discover citations to datasets, in citation lists and elsewhere.  Ways to find blog posts written about research papers — and whether those blog posts, in turn, inspire conversation and new thinking.  We need ways to find out which research is being bookmarked, read, and thought about even if that background learning doesn’t lead to citations.  Research impact isn’t the one dimensional winners-and-losers situation we have now with our single-minded reliance on citation counts: it is multi-dimensional — research has an impact flavour, not an impact number.

Metrics data locked behind subscription paywalls might have made sense years ago, when gathering citation data required a team of people typing in citation lists.  That isn’t the world we live in any more: keeping our evaluation and discovery metrics locked behind subscription paywalls is simply neither necessary nor acceptable.  Tools need to be open, provide provenance and context, and support a broad range of research products.

We’re realizing this future through ImpactStory: a nonprofit organization dedicated to telling the story of our research impact.  Researchers can build a CV that includes citations and altmetrics for their papers, datasets, software, and slides: embedding altmetrics on a CV is a powerful agent of change for scholars and scholarship.  ImpactStory is co-founded by me and Jason Priem, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation while we become self-sustaining, and is committed to building a future that is good for scholarship.  Check it out! and contact if you want to learn more: team@impactstory.org

Thanks for the great questions, Tim!

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